Gender differences in the use of FTAs when reporting incidents of UI: an Indian study by Asha Kaul and Esha Patnaik (Working Paper No. WP 2006-03-04 1936)

By: Kaul, Asha
Contributor(s): Patnaik, Esha
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management 2006Description: 24 p.Subject(s): Gender difference - India | Face Threatening Acts (FTAs) | Upwad influenceDDC classification: WP 2006-03-04-1936 Summary: The study, conducted in an Indian organization, aims to examine differences, if any, across genders in the use of face threatening acts (FTAs) while reporting incidents of upward influence (UI). The nature of incidents reported for use of UI entails the possible use of FTAs, that is, challenging the positive or negative face of the target to achieve certain desired objectives. Given research evidence on the differences in communication styles between men and women, we examined the possibility of any such differences in the use of FTA in reported speech within an organization. No significant differences were found between women and men in the use of FTAs. When the target was of the opposite gender as the agent, the latter was more likely to use either bald on-record or on-record with regressive action strategy for influencing. In cases where both the interact-ants were of the same gender, the agent generally used FTAs such as on-record with regressive action and solidarity politeness to gain compliance. A combination of UI strategies was employed in such instances.
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The study, conducted in an Indian organization, aims to examine differences, if any, across genders in the use of face threatening acts (FTAs) while reporting incidents of upward influence (UI). The nature of incidents reported for use of UI entails the possible use of FTAs, that is, challenging the positive or negative face of the target to achieve certain desired objectives. Given research evidence on the differences in communication styles between men and women, we examined the possibility of any such differences in the use of FTA in reported speech within an organization. No significant differences were found between women and men in the use of FTAs. When the target was of the opposite gender as the agent, the latter was more likely to use either bald on-record or on-record with regressive action strategy for influencing. In cases where both the interact-ants were of the same gender, the agent generally used FTAs such as on-record with regressive action and solidarity politeness to gain compliance. A combination of UI strategies was employed in such instances.

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