Integrated problem solving and decision making: matching ability and training with management reality by Sasi Misra (Working Paper, No.1990/869) Misra, Sasi

By: Misra, Sasi
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management 1990Description: 16 p.Subject(s): Problem Solving | Decision-making | Training | ManagementDDC classification: WP 1990 (869) Summary: To solve problems parsimoniously and make decisions well, to-be-managers must possess the requisite ability (intelligence) and acquire the needed professional skills through education and training. According to the authors, the prevalent bases of selection (e.g. GMAT score) and teaching methods (e.g. lecture method) do not adequately meet the requirements of managerial work that are often non routine, loosely structured, and non-deliberative. The authors present an alternative view of "intelligence" advanced by Das (1988) that goes beyond IQ. They also describe Dorner"s work (1981, 1989) that highlights barriers to human problem solving. From these two lines of work, implications for student selection (input) and design of teaching-learning programmes (throughout) are drawn. In the latter context, the usefulness of problem-solving-oriented teaching material (e.g. cases) and the case method are suggested.
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To solve problems parsimoniously and make decisions well, to-be-managers must possess the requisite ability (intelligence) and acquire the needed professional skills through education and training. According to the authors, the prevalent bases of selection (e.g. GMAT score) and teaching methods (e.g. lecture method) do not adequately meet the requirements of managerial work that are often non routine, loosely structured, and non-deliberative. The authors present an alternative view of "intelligence" advanced by Das (1988) that goes beyond IQ. They also describe Dorner"s work (1981, 1989) that highlights barriers to human problem solving. From these two lines of work, implications for student selection (input) and design of teaching-learning programmes (throughout) are drawn. In the latter context, the usefulness of problem-solving-oriented teaching material (e.g. cases) and the case method are suggested.

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