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Urban agriculture, urban planning and the Ahmedabad experience by R. S. Ganapathy (Working Paper, No. 1984/530)

By: Ganapathy, R. S.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management 1984Description: 41 p.Subject(s): Urban planning | AgricultureDDC classification: WP 1984 (530) Summary: Cities all over the world are growing rapidly and the manifestations of the Urban Crisis in a variety of areas, viz., environment, food, health, energy, land use, are quire evident. Urban land use patters are changing dramatically due to the pressure of population and the role of agriculture in supplying food, fuel, forage and forest products has declined considerably. The urban poor's access to food has become worse and they have to pay higher prices for food and fuelwood, while their incomes are growing more slowly. The food subsidies and public distribution systems for essential commodities defuse and contain the crisis in the short term but do not address the needs of the poor in the long term. The paper looks at the experience of Ahmedabad, an Indian city and the historical transition of urban food system and develops alternatives for urban planning what focus on urban agriculture.
List(s) this item appears in: Warsha_urban_biblio | Ahmedabad,Surat,Mumbai
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Working Paper Vikram Sarabhai Library
WP 1984 (530) (Browse shelf) Available WP000530

Cities all over the world are growing rapidly and the manifestations of the Urban Crisis in a variety of areas, viz., environment, food, health, energy, land use, are quire evident. Urban land use patters are changing dramatically due to the pressure of population and the role of agriculture in supplying food, fuel, forage and forest products has declined considerably. The urban poor's access to food has become worse and they have to pay higher prices for food and fuelwood, while their incomes are growing more slowly. The food subsidies and public distribution systems for essential commodities defuse and contain the crisis in the short term but do not address the needs of the poor in the long term. The paper looks at the experience of Ahmedabad, an Indian city and the historical transition of urban food system and develops alternatives for urban planning what focus on urban agriculture.

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