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The Nagarsheth of Ahmedabad: The history of an urban institution in a Gujarat City by Dwijendra Tripathi and M. J. Mehta (Working Paper, No. 1978/255)

By: Tripathi, Dwijendra.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management 1978Description: 26 p.Subject(s): History - Ahmedabad | NagarshethDDC classification: WP 1978 (255) Summary: The paper claims that Nagarshethship in Ahmedabad was an innovation in urban institution. Challenging the popularly held view that the institution began with Emperor Jehangir conferring this title on a principal merchant, the authors emphasize that the institution had a more spontaneous beginning and evolved gradually. It became hereditary after a Moghul emperor accorded official sanction to it in 1732. However, the rise of more formal institutions and the growth of industrial leadership after the establishment of the British rule, the institution became superfluous and gradually disappeared. Regretting that the conventional periodization of Indian history has hampered the study of institutional history, the authors plead for problem oriented rather than period based research.
List(s) this item appears in: Dwijendra Tripathi_ works | IIMA History | Ahmedabad,Surat,Mumbai
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Working Paper Vikram Sarabhai Library
WP 1978 (255) (Browse shelf) Available WP000255

The paper claims that Nagarshethship in Ahmedabad was an innovation in urban institution. Challenging the popularly held view that the institution began with Emperor Jehangir conferring this title on a principal merchant, the authors emphasize that the institution had a more spontaneous beginning and evolved gradually. It became hereditary after a Moghul emperor accorded official sanction to it in 1732. However, the rise of more formal institutions and the growth of industrial leadership after the establishment of the British rule, the institution became superfluous and gradually disappeared. Regretting that the conventional periodization of Indian history has hampered the study of institutional history, the authors plead for problem oriented rather than period based research.

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