Interpersonal themes of Indian during sensitivity training by Pulin K Garg (Working Paper, No. 1973/12) Garg, Pulin K.

By: Garg, Pulin K
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management 1973Description: 18 p.DDC classification: WP 1973 (12) Summary: In this paper the author presents a new approach to sensitivity training based on Intra-person and interpersonal approaches. The based concern is with the problems of adjustment on an individual in a rapidly changing technological society. In this method the participants are encouraged to talk freely about their psycho-social world and a multiplicity of experiences is this generated in which the persons can re-examine their feeling structure for purpose of self-review and growth. The trainer in such an approach is more than a trainer- he is a person. This approach was tried out very successfully with five groups of students from a leading Business school over a period of three years. These Seminars also provided data about the very personal and private themes of the youth who attended. The dominant feeling in Indian youth seems to be one of "rejection" and this is also borne out by historical inputs.
List(s) this item appears in: Prof. Pulin K. Garg
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Working Paper Vikram Sarabhai Library
WP 1973 (12) (Browse shelf) Available WP000012

In this paper the author presents a new approach to sensitivity training based on Intra-person and interpersonal approaches. The based concern is with the problems of adjustment on an individual in a rapidly changing technological society. In this method the participants are encouraged to talk freely about their psycho-social world and a multiplicity of experiences is this generated in which the persons can re-examine their feeling structure for purpose of self-review and growth. The trainer in such an approach is more than a trainer- he is a person. This approach was tried out very successfully with five groups of students from a leading Business school over a period of three years. These Seminars also provided data about the very personal and private themes of the youth who attended. The dominant feeling in Indian youth seems to be one of "rejection" and this is also borne out by historical inputs.

There are no comments for this item.

to post a comment.

Powered by Koha