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Firm innovation in emerging markets: the role of governance and finance

By: Ayyagari, Meghana.
Contributor(s): Demirguc-Kunt, Asli.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Washington, D.C. World Bank 2007Description: n.p.Subject(s): Small Scale Enterprise | Innovation | Microfinance | Investment and Investment ClimateDDC classification: ER50 Online resources: E-book Summary: The authors investigate the determinants of firm innovation in over 19,000 firms across 47 developing economies. They define the innovation process broadly, to include not only core innovation such as the introduction of new products and new technologies, but also other types of activities that promote knowledge transfers and adapt production processes. The authors find that more innovative firms are large exporting firms characterized by private ownership, highly educated managers with mid-level managerial experience, and access to external finance. In contrast, firms that do not innovate much are typically state-owned firms without foreign competitors. The identity of the controlling shareholder seems to be particularly important for core innovation, with those private firms whose controlling shareholder is a financial institution being the least innovative. While the use of external finance is associated with greater innovation by all private firms, it does not make state-owned firms more innovative. Financing from foreign banks is associated with higher levels of innovation compared with financing from domestic banks.
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Electronic Resources Vikram Sarabhai Library
Electronic Resources
Reference ER50 (Browse shelf) Available ER000050

The authors investigate the determinants of firm innovation in over 19,000 firms across 47 developing economies. They define the innovation process broadly, to include not only core innovation such as the introduction of new products and new technologies, but also other types of activities that promote knowledge transfers and adapt production processes. The authors find that more innovative firms are large exporting firms characterized by private ownership, highly educated managers with mid-level managerial experience, and access to external finance. In contrast, firms that do not innovate much are typically state-owned firms without foreign competitors. The identity of the controlling shareholder seems to be particularly important for core innovation, with those private firms whose controlling shareholder is a financial institution being the least innovative. While the use of external finance is associated with greater innovation by all private firms, it does not make state-owned firms more innovative. Financing from foreign banks is associated with higher levels of innovation compared with financing from domestic banks.

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