Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Assessing job flows across countries: the role of industry, firm size, and regulations

By: Haltiwanger, John.
Contributor(s): Scarpetta, Stefano | Schweiger, Helena.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Policy Research Working Paper, no.4070. Publisher: Washington, D.C. World Bank 2006Description: 53 p. Includes bibliographical references.Subject(s): Small scale industries | Microfinance | Labour marketsDDC classification: 338.63 Summary: This paper analyzes job flows in a sample of 16 industrial and emerging economies over the past decade, exploiting a harmonized firm-level dataset. It shows that industry and firm size effects (and especially firm size) account for a large fraction in the overall variability in job flows. However, large residual differences remain in the job flow patterns across countries. To account for the latter, the paper explores the role of differences in employment protection legislation across countries. Using a difference-in-difference approach that minimizes possible endogeneity and omitted variable problems, our findings show that hiring and firing costs tend to curb job flows, particularly in those industries and firm size classes that require more frequent labor adjustment.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 925 (0 Floor, East Wing) 338.63 H2A8 (Browse shelf) Available 162843

This paper analyzes job flows in a sample of 16 industrial and emerging economies over the past decade, exploiting a harmonized firm-level dataset. It shows that industry and firm size effects (and especially firm size) account for a large fraction in the overall variability in job flows. However, large residual differences remain in the job flow patterns across countries. To account for the latter, the paper explores the role of differences in employment protection legislation across countries. Using a difference-in-difference approach that minimizes possible endogeneity and omitted variable problems, our findings show that hiring and firing costs tend to curb job flows, particularly in those industries and firm size classes that require more frequent labor adjustment.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha