Beyond Kyoto: advancing the international effort against climate change

By: Aldy, Joseph E
Contributor(s): Baron, Richard | Heller, Thomas C
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Arlington Pew Center on Global Climate Change 2003Description: iv, 170 p.Subject(s): Climatic change | Global warmingDDC classification: 574.92 Summary: Addressing cost—and the perception of cost—is a central issue in fashioning an effective international response to climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions occur as a by-product of virtually every type of economic activity, from driving a car to using a computer, operating a steel mill, or growing rice. Any effort to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will require investments in new technology and probably changes in behavior—in short, modifications to economic activity that entail costs to society. These costs could be substantial for some activities and could vary significantly across countries. Strictly from an economic vantage point, it is important that any international strategy against climate change include measures to manage cost. Perhaps more importantly, though, addressing cost concerns is key to securing the broadest possible participation in a climate agreement, and to ensuring that parties ultimately fulfill their commitments. Successfully addressing cost, in other words, is essential to achieving the goal of climate protection.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 1705 (2 Floor, East Wing) 574.92 A5B3 (Browse shelf) Available 155956

Addressing cost—and the perception of cost—is a central issue in
fashioning an effective international response to climate change. Greenhouse gas
emissions occur as a by-product of virtually every type of economic activity, from driving a car to using a
computer, operating a steel mill, or growing rice. Any effort to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
will require investments in new technology and probably changes in behavior—in short, modifications to
economic activity that entail costs to society. These costs could be substantial for some activities and
could vary significantly across countries. Strictly from an economic vantage point, it is important that
any international strategy against climate change include measures to manage cost. Perhaps more
importantly, though, addressing cost concerns is key to securing the broadest possible participation
in a climate agreement, and to ensuring that parties ultimately fulfill their commitments. Successfully
addressing cost, in other words, is essential to achieving the goal of climate protection.

There are no comments for this item.

to post a comment.

Powered by Koha