Governing by (in)visibilising: a case of waste materials, infrastructure and work

By: Rajendra, AdvaitaMaterial type: Computer fileComputer filePublication details: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad 2022Description: xii, 346 p. ill. Includes bibliographical references, abbreviations, appendixSubject(s): Waste work | Social workers | India | CleanlinessDDC classification: TH 2022-1 Online resources: eThesis Summary: India has a long history of condemning Dalits and Bahujans and later Adivasis to waste-work. Intersections and overlays of caste, gender, historic exclusion, and policy neglect are mired in waste-work – work that is essential yet paradoxically invisible (Mander, 2006; Harriss-White, 2020). In recent times, especially since 2014 and the launch of the National Cleanliness Mission in India, policies have promised ‘improvements’ (Li, 2007). Interventions have attempted altering waste flows – modifying categories of waste materials and of legitimate spaces (e.g., claiming segregation of household waste materials and open-defecation free spaces); re-designing infrastructures (e.g., building toilets, encouraging door-to-door collection and remediating landfills); and re-ordering organisational forms of waste-work (e.g., introduction of ‘formalised’ self-help groups). We argue that the political-administrative processes of (in)visibilisation of waste materials, infrastructure and labour is intermingled with social hierarchies of caste and gender and has been highly ‘selective’.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Thesis (FPM) Vikram Sarabhai Library
Reference
Non-fiction TH 2022-1 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Not for Issue (Restricted Access) CD002686

Thesis Advisory Committee

Prof. Ankur Sarin (Chair)
Prof. Ajay Pandey
Prof. Barbara Harriss-White

India has a long history of condemning Dalits and Bahujans and later Adivasis to waste-work. Intersections and overlays of caste, gender, historic exclusion, and policy neglect are mired in waste-work – work that is essential yet paradoxically invisible (Mander, 2006; Harriss-White, 2020). In recent times, especially since 2014 and the launch of the National Cleanliness Mission in India, policies have promised ‘improvements’ (Li, 2007). Interventions have attempted altering waste flows – modifying categories of waste materials and of legitimate spaces (e.g., claiming segregation of household waste materials and open-defecation free spaces); re-designing infrastructures (e.g., building toilets, encouraging door-to-door collection and remediating landfills); and re-ordering organisational forms of waste-work (e.g., introduction of ‘formalised’ self-help groups). We argue that the political-administrative processes of (in)visibilisation of waste materials, infrastructure and labour is intermingled with social hierarchies of caste and gender and has been highly ‘selective’.

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