The age of addiction: how bad habits became big business

By: Courtwright, David T
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge The Belknap Press 2019Description: 325 p.: ill. Includes bibliographical referencesISBN: 9780674737372Subject(s): Psychology - Pathological | Capitalism | Hedonism | Compulsive behavior | Capitalism - Psychological aspectsDDC classification: 616.85227 Summary: We live in an age of addiction, from compulsive gaming and shopping to binge eating and opioid abuse. Sugar can be as habit-forming as cocaine, researchers tell us, and social media apps are hooking our kids. But what can we do to resist temptations that insidiously and deliberately rewire our brains? Nothing, David Courtwright says, unless we understand the history and character of the global enterprises that create and cater to our bad habits. The Age of Addiction chronicles the triumph of "limbic capitalism," the growing network of competitive businesses targeting the brain pathways responsible for feeling, motivation, and long-term memory. We see its success in Steve Wynn's groundbreaking casinos and Purdue Pharma's pain pills, in McDonald's engineered burgers and Tencent video games from China. All capitalize on the ancient quest to discover, cultivate, and refine new and habituating pleasures. Courtwright holds out hope that limbic capitalism can be contained by organized opposition from across the political spectrum. Progressives, nationalists, and traditionalists have worked together against the purveyors of addiction before. They could do it again. An authoritative history reveals how global businesses have targeted the human brain's reward center, driving people to addiction and creating alarming social consequences. https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674737372
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
On Display
Slot 1738 (2 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 616.85227 C6A4 (Browse shelf) Available 203070

Table of contents:

1.Newfound pleasures
2.Mass pleasures
3.Liberating enslaving pleasures
4.Anti-vice activism
5.Pro-vice activism
6.Food addictions
7.Digital addictions
8.Against excess

We live in an age of addiction, from compulsive gaming and shopping to binge eating and opioid abuse. Sugar can be as habit-forming as cocaine, researchers tell us, and social media apps are hooking our kids. But what can we do to resist temptations that insidiously and deliberately rewire our brains? Nothing, David Courtwright says, unless we understand the history and character of the global enterprises that create and cater to our bad habits. The Age of Addiction chronicles the triumph of "limbic capitalism," the growing network of competitive businesses targeting the brain pathways responsible for feeling, motivation, and long-term memory. We see its success in Steve Wynn's groundbreaking casinos and Purdue Pharma's pain pills, in McDonald's engineered burgers and Tencent video games from China. All capitalize on the ancient quest to discover, cultivate, and refine new and habituating pleasures. Courtwright holds out hope that limbic capitalism can be contained by organized opposition from across the political spectrum. Progressives, nationalists, and traditionalists have worked together against the purveyors of addiction before. They could do it again. An authoritative history reveals how global businesses have targeted the human brain's reward center, driving people to addiction and creating alarming social consequences.

https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674737372

There are no comments for this item.

to post a comment.

Powered by Koha