The rise of Theodore Roosevelt

By: Morris, Edmund
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York Random House Trade Paperbacks 2001Description: xxxiv, 920 p.: ill. Includes bibliographical references and indexISBN: 9780375756788Subject(s): Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919 | Politics and government | Presidents - United States | New York (State)DDC classification: 973.911092 Summary: This classic biography is the story of seven men—a naturalist, a writer, a lover, a hunter, a ranchman, a soldier, and a politician—who merged at age forty-two to become the youngest President in history. The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt begins at the apex of his international prestige. That was on New Year’s Day, 1907, when TR, who had just won the Nobel Peace Prize, threw open the doors of the White House to the American people and shook 8,150 hands. One visitor remarked afterward, "You go to the White House, you shake hands with Roosevelt and hear him talk—and then you go home to wring the personality out of your clothes." The rest of this book tells the story of TR’s irresistible rise to power. During the years 1858–1901, Theodore Roosevelt transformed himself from a frail, asthmatic boy into a full-blooded man. Fresh out of Harvard, he simultaneously published a distinguished work of naval history and became the fist-swinging leader of a Republican insurgency in the New York State Assembly. He chased thieves across the Badlands of North Dakota with a copy of Anna Karenina in one hand and a Winchester rifle in the other. Married to his childhood sweetheart in 1886, he became the country squire of Sagamore Hill on Long Island, a flamboyant civil service reformer in Washington, D.C., and a night-stalking police commissioner in New York City. As assistant secretary of the navy, he almost single-handedly brought about the Spanish-American War. After leading "Roosevelt’s Rough Riders" in the famous charge up San Juan Hill, Cuba, he returned home a military hero, and was rewarded with the governorship of New York. In what he called his "spare hours" he fathered six children and wrote fourteen books. By 1901, the man Senator Mark Hanna called "that damned cowboy" was vice president. Seven months later, an assassin’s bullet gave TR the national leadership he had always craved. His is a story so prodigal in its variety, so surprising in its turns of fate, that previous biographers have treated it as a series of haphazard episodes. This book, the only full study of TR’s pre-presidential years, shows that he was an inevitable chief executive. "It was as if he were subconsciously aware that he was a man of many selves," the author writes, "and set about developing each one in turn, knowing that one day he would be President of all the people." https://www.penguin.com.au/books/rise-of-theodore-roosevelt-9780375756788
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Slot 2454 (3 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 973.911092 M6R4 (Browse shelf) Available 202716

Table of contents

Prologue: New Year's Day, 1907
Pt. 1. 1858-1886
1. The Very Small Person
2. The Mind, But Not the Body
3. The Man with the Morning in His Face
4. The Swell in the Dog Cart
5. The Political Hack
6. The Cyclone Assemblyman
7. The Fighting Cock
8. The Dude from New York
9. The Honorable Gentleman
10. The Delegate-at-Large
11. The Cowboy of the Present
12. The Four-Eyed Maverick
13. The Long Arm of the Law
14. The Next Mayor of New York
Interlude: Winter of the Blue Snow, 1886-1887
Pt. 2. 1887-1901
15. The Literary Feller
16. The Silver-Plated Reform Commissioner
17. The Dear Old Beloved Brother
18. The Universe Spinner
19. The Biggest Man in New York
20. The Snake in the Grass
21. The Glorious Retreat
22. The Hot Weather Secretary
23. The Lieutenant Colonel
24. The Rough Rider
25. The Wolf Rising in the Heart
26. The Most Famous Man in America
27. The Boy Governor
28. The Man of Destiny.
Epilogue: September 1901

This classic biography is the story of seven men—a naturalist, a writer, a lover, a hunter, a ranchman, a soldier, and a politician—who merged at age forty-two to become the youngest President in history.
The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt begins at the apex of his international prestige. That was on New Year’s Day, 1907, when TR, who had just won the Nobel Peace Prize, threw open the doors of the White House to the American people and shook 8,150 hands. One visitor remarked afterward, "You go to the White House, you shake hands with Roosevelt and hear him talk—and then you go home to wring the personality out of your clothes."
The rest of this book tells the story of TR’s irresistible rise to power. During the years 1858–1901, Theodore Roosevelt transformed himself from a frail, asthmatic boy into a full-blooded man. Fresh out of Harvard, he simultaneously published a distinguished work of naval history and became the fist-swinging leader of a Republican insurgency in the New York State Assembly. He chased thieves across the Badlands of North Dakota with a copy of Anna Karenina in one hand and a Winchester rifle in the other. Married to his childhood sweetheart in 1886, he became the country squire of Sagamore Hill on Long Island, a flamboyant civil service reformer in Washington, D.C., and a night-stalking police commissioner in New York City. As assistant secretary of the navy, he almost single-handedly brought about the Spanish-American War. After leading "Roosevelt’s Rough Riders" in the famous charge up San Juan Hill, Cuba, he returned home a military hero, and was rewarded with the governorship of New York. In what he called his "spare hours" he fathered six children and wrote fourteen books. By 1901, the man Senator Mark Hanna called "that damned cowboy" was vice president. Seven months later, an assassin’s bullet gave TR the national leadership he had always craved.
His is a story so prodigal in its variety, so surprising in its turns of fate, that previous biographers have treated it as a series of haphazard episodes. This book, the only full study of TR’s pre-presidential years, shows that he was an inevitable chief executive. "It was as if he were subconsciously aware that he was a man of many selves," the author writes, "and set about developing each one in turn, knowing that one day he would be President of all the people."

https://www.penguin.com.au/books/rise-of-theodore-roosevelt-9780375756788

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