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Racist logic: markets, drugs, sex

Contributor(s): Chasman, Deborah [Editor] | Cohen, Joshua [Editor].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Boston review forum; 10. Publisher: Boston Louisa Daniels Kearney 2019Description: 124 p.ISBN: 9781946511362.Subject(s): Racism - United States | African Americans - Substance use | Racism - Economic aspects | Drug abuseDDC classification: 305.896073 Summary: The history of international banking, the commodification of black masculinity, the buying and selling of women's eggs, Michelle Obama's dubious advice to black youth, and the workings of affirmative action at elite universities viewed through the lens of racial capitalism. In Racist Logic, lead essayist Donna Murch writes that “historically, the division between 'dope' and medicine was the race and class of users.” By using the concept of “racial capitalism” to examine the opioid crisis alongside the War on Drugs, Murch brings an otherwise familiar story into new territory. To understand the twisted logic that created the divergent responses to drug use—succor and sympathy for white users, prison, and expulsion for people of color—Murch shows how a racialized regime of drug prohibitions led Purdue Pharma to market OxyContin specifically to whites. Alongside Murch, contributors consider how racial capitalism helps us understand the history of international banking, the commodification of black masculinity, the buying and selling of women's eggs, Michelle Obama's dubious advice to black youth, and the workings of affirmative action at elite universities. https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/racist-logic
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Slot 355 (0 Floor, West Wing) Non-fiction 305.896073 R2 (Browse shelf) Available 202102

Table of contents

Editor's note /​ Deborah Chasman &​ Joshua Cohen
Forum. How race made the opioid crisis /​ Donna Murch
Forum responses. Race and the first opium crisis /​ Max Mishler
Black drugs, white drugs /​ Britt Rusert
The cure amplifies the problem /​ Helena Hansen, Julie Netherland, &​ David Herzbert
No gentler war on drugs /​ Michael Collins
The supremacy of toughness /​ Julilly Kohler-Hausmann
Denying racism /​ Jonathan Kahn
From absolution to accountability /​ L.A. Kauffman
Public policy made Americans the biggest consumers of opioids in the world /​ Donna Murch
Essays. Bankers and empire /​ Peter James Hudson
Branded /​ Jordanna Matlon
Reproducing racial capitalism /​ Alys Eve Weinbaum
Succeeding while black /​ Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Democratizing elitism /​ Richard Thompson Ford.

The history of international banking, the commodification of black masculinity, the buying and selling of women's eggs, Michelle Obama's dubious advice to black youth, and the workings of affirmative action at elite universities viewed through the lens of racial capitalism.
In Racist Logic, lead essayist Donna Murch writes that “historically, the division between 'dope' and medicine was the race and class of users.” By using the concept of “racial capitalism” to examine the opioid crisis alongside the War on Drugs, Murch brings an otherwise familiar story into new territory. To understand the twisted logic that created the divergent responses to drug use—succor and sympathy for white users, prison, and expulsion for people of color—Murch shows how a racialized regime of drug prohibitions led Purdue Pharma to market OxyContin specifically to whites.
Alongside Murch, contributors consider how racial capitalism helps us understand the history of international banking, the commodification of black masculinity, the buying and selling of women's eggs, Michelle Obama's dubious advice to black youth, and the workings of affirmative action at elite universities.

https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/racist-logic

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