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Atomic state: big science in twentieth-century India

By: Phalkey, Jahnavi.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Ranikhet Permanent Black 2019Description: xvii,335 p. Includes bibliographical references and index.ISBN: 9788178245485.Subject(s): Nuclear physics | History | IndiaDDC classification: 539.70954 Summary: In 1974 India conducted what it called “peaceful nuclear tests.” These demonstrated that the country possessed the technology required to make atom bombs. In historical accounts, this explosive achievement has come to be seen as the culmination of a state’s efforts at capacity building and self-reliance through “big science.” Questioning the received wisdom, Jahnavi Phalkey provides a fascinatingly different history. Mining new data from personal and institutional archives, she contradicts persistent nationalist notions about early atomic science in India as the starting point of bombs. She shows that the emergence of the country’s nuclear science infrastructure was in fact tenuous, contradictory, and rich in faction fights which frequently determined outcomes and directions. Phalkey traces the academic roots of India’s nuclear research to universities, industrial philanthropy, leading scientists, and laboratories: C.V. Raman, Meghnad Saha, Homi Bhabha, Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar, and Jawaharlal Nehru are among her book’s major protagonists; and Calcutta, Bombay, and Bangalore the institutional centres. Big science in India is located via three transitions: of nuclear physics from table-top experiments to electronic equipment systems; of India from imperial rule to independence; and of international relations from imperialism to the Cold War. http://orientblackswan.com/details?id=9788178243764
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Slot 1698 (2 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 539.70954 P4A8 (Browse shelf) Available 200306

Table on contents:

List of Figures and Tables
Acknowledgements
Glossary
Introduction
Nitin Sinha and Nitin Varma

I. FEMALE DOMESTICS AND MORAL ORDERS
1. From Bibis to Ayahs: Sexual Labour, Domestic Labour, and the Moral Politics of Empire Satyasikha Chakraborty
2. The Many Lives of Ayah: Life Trajectories of Female Servants in Early Nineteenth-Century India Nitin Varma
3. Training a Servant Class: Gender, Poverty and Domestic Labour in Early Nineteenth-Century Educational Sources
Jana Tschurenev
4. Streamlining Paid Domestic Labour in Postcolonial India: The New Female ‘All-Rounder’ in Master–Servant Expatriate Relationships
Shalini Grover

Interjection 1
Slavery and a History of Domestic Work
Samita Sen

II. SERVANTS IN LITERARY AND PUBLIC WORLDS
5. Representing Servant Lives in the Household and Beyond
Prabhat Kumar
6. Servants and Mistresses: Literary and Legal Sketches in Early Twentieth-Century Uttar Pradesh
Charu Gupta
7. Caste–ing Servants in Colonial Calcutta
Tanika Sarkar

Interjection 2
Agency and Domestic Workers
Lucy Delap
Bibliography
Notes on the Editors and Contributors
Index

In 1974 India conducted what it called “peaceful nuclear tests.” These demonstrated that the country possessed the technology required to make atom bombs. In historical accounts, this explosive achievement has come to be seen as the culmination of a state’s efforts at capacity building and self-reliance through “big science.”
Questioning the received wisdom, Jahnavi Phalkey provides a fascinatingly different history. Mining new data from personal and institutional archives, she contradicts persistent nationalist notions about early atomic science in India as the starting point of bombs. She shows that the emergence of the country’s nuclear science infrastructure was in fact tenuous, contradictory, and rich in faction fights which frequently determined outcomes and directions.
Phalkey traces the academic roots of India’s nuclear research to universities, industrial philanthropy, leading scientists, and laboratories: C.V. Raman, Meghnad Saha, Homi Bhabha, Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar, and Jawaharlal Nehru are among her book’s major protagonists; and Calcutta, Bombay, and Bangalore the institutional centres. Big science in India is located via three transitions: of nuclear physics from table-top experiments to electronic equipment systems; of India from imperial rule to independence; and of international relations from imperialism to the Cold War.

http://orientblackswan.com/details?id=9788178243764

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