Relocating the law of geographical indications

By: Gangjee, Dev
Material type: TextTextSeries: Cambridge Intellectual Property and Information LawPublisher: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2012Description: xvii, 341 pISBN: 9781107542655Subject(s): Marks of origin | Intellectual property (International law) | Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (1994 April 15) | Intellectual propertyDDC classification: 346.048 Summary: There is considerable variation in the nature, scope and institutional forms of legal protection for valuable geographical brands such as Champagne, Colombian coffee and Darjeeling tea. While regional products are increasingly important for producers, consumers and policy makers, the international legal regime under the TRIPS Agreement remains unclear. Adopting a historical approach, Dev Gangjee explores the rules regulating these valuable geographical designations within international intellectual property law. He traces the emergence of geographical indications as a distinct category while investigating the key distinguishing feature of the link between regional products and their places of origin. The research addresses long-standing puzzles, such as the multiplicity of regimes operating in this area; the recognition of the link between product and place and its current articulation in the TRIPS definition; the varying scope of protection; and the extent to which geographical indications ought to be treated as a category distinct from trade marks. Historical account of international GI protection brings together a number of archival sources and interdisciplinary materials to explain the current international legal regime Tackles the unanswered questions and gaps in this area, bringing conceptual clarity to a notoriously complex area of intellectual property law Overview of international GI protection will be of use to legal scholars, legal practitioners, business and economic historians, geographers, rural sociologists and others who are beginning to study the potential for traditional regional products more closely Read more at http://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/law/intellectual-property/relocating-law-geographical-indications#PlP23PVVt8hOUuQ6.99
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There is considerable variation in the nature, scope and institutional forms of legal protection for valuable geographical brands such as Champagne, Colombian coffee and Darjeeling tea. While regional products are increasingly important for producers, consumers and policy makers, the international legal regime under the TRIPS Agreement remains unclear. Adopting a historical approach, Dev Gangjee explores the rules regulating these valuable geographical designations within international intellectual property law. He traces the emergence of geographical indications as a distinct category while investigating the key distinguishing feature of the link between regional products and their places of origin. The research addresses long-standing puzzles, such as the multiplicity of regimes operating in this area; the recognition of the link between product and place and its current articulation in the TRIPS definition; the varying scope of protection; and the extent to which geographical indications ought to be treated as a category distinct from trade marks.

Historical account of international GI protection brings together a number of archival sources and interdisciplinary materials to explain the current international legal regime
Tackles the unanswered questions and gaps in this area, bringing conceptual clarity to a notoriously complex area of intellectual property law
Overview of international GI protection will be of use to legal scholars, legal practitioners, business and economic historians, geographers, rural sociologists and others who are beginning to study the potential for traditional regional products more closely


Read more at http://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/law/intellectual-property/relocating-law-geographical-indications#PlP23PVVt8hOUuQ6.99

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