Female entrepreneurship in nineteenth-century England: engagement in the urban economy

By: Aston, JenniferSeries: Palgrave studies in economic history seriesPublication details: London Palgrave Macmillan 2016Description: xvii, 257 pISBN: 9783319308791Subject(s): Businesswoman | Entrepreneurship | Women-owned business enterprisesDDC classification: 658.421082 Summary: Aston challenges and reshapes the on-going debate concerning social status, economic opportunity, and gender roles in nineteenth-century society. Sources including trade directories, census returns, probate records, newspapers, advertisements, and photographs are analysed and linked to demonstrate conclusively that women in nineteenth-century England were far more prevalent in business than previously acknowledged. Moreover, women were able to establish and expand their businesses far beyond the scope of inter-generational caretakers in sectors of the economy traditionally viewed as unfeminine, and acquire the assets and possessions that were necessary to secure middle-class status. These women serve as a powerful reminder that the middle-class woman’s retreat from economic activity during the nineteenth-century, so often accepted as axiomatic, was not the case. In fact, women continued to act as autonomous and independent entrepreneurs, and used business ownership as a platform to participate in the economic, philanthropic, and political public sphere. https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9783319308791#aboutBook
List(s) this item appears in: Women Entrepreneurship
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Item type Current library Item location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
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Rack 38-B / Slot 2166 (2nd Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 658.421082 A8F3 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 193200

Table of content
1. Introduction
2. Locating Female Business Owners in the Historiography
3. Women and Their Businesses
4. Who Was the Victorian Businesswoman?
5. The Social Network
6. Life After Death
7. Conclusion


Aston challenges and reshapes the on-going debate concerning social status, economic opportunity, and gender roles in nineteenth-century society. Sources including trade directories, census returns, probate records, newspapers, advertisements, and photographs are analysed and linked to demonstrate conclusively that women in nineteenth-century England were far more prevalent in business than previously acknowledged. Moreover, women were able to establish and expand their businesses far beyond the scope of inter-generational caretakers in sectors of the economy traditionally viewed as unfeminine, and acquire the assets and possessions that were necessary to secure middle-class status. These women serve as a powerful reminder that the middle-class woman’s retreat from economic activity during the nineteenth-century, so often accepted as axiomatic, was not the case. In fact, women continued to act as autonomous and independent entrepreneurs, and used business ownership as a platform to participate in the economic, philanthropic, and political public sphere.

https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9783319308791#aboutBook

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