Cost-benefit analysis and health care evaluations

By: Brent, Robert J
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cheltenham, UK Edward Elgar Publishing 2014Edition: 2nd edDescription: 5112 p.ISBN: 9781783477722Subject(s): Medical care - Cost effectiveness | Research - Methodology | Cost effectivenessDDC classification: 362.10681 Summary: Cost-benefit analysis is the only method of economic evaluation that can effectively indicate whether a health care treatment or intervention is worthwhile. In this thoroughly updated and revised second edition, Robert Brent expands the scope of the field by including the latest concepts and applications throughout all regions of the world. This book attempts to strengthen the link between cost-benefit analysis and the mainstream health care evaluation field, which is dominated by non-economists. The need to build a bridge between the two is more important than ever before, as the general understanding of cost-benefit analysis appears to have regressed"--Publisher's description. http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/cost-benefit-analysis-and-health-care-evaluations-second-edition
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Slot 1151 (0 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 362.10681 B7C6-2014 (Browse shelf) Available 193254

Table of content

pt. I1.Introduction to health care evaluation
1.1.Introduction
1. 1.2.Types of economic evaluation
2. 1.3.CEA as CBA: using a threshold value for price
3. 1.4.The basics of cost-benefit analysis
4. 1.5.Applications
5. 1.6.Final section

pt. II CM AND CBA
6. 2.Cost minimization and the definition of `cost'
7. 2.1.Introduction
8. 2.2.Cost minimization and economic theory
9. 2.3.Cost-benefit analysis and cost minimization
10. 2.4.Applications
11. 2.5.Final section
12. 3.Types of costs and their measurement
13. 3.1.Introduction
14. 3.2.Costs and markets
15. 3.3.Costs versus charges
16. 3.4.CM and cost standardization
17. 3.5.Applications
18. 3.6.Final section
19. 4.External costs
20. 4.1.Introduction
21. 4.2.External costs and markets
22. 4.3.External costs and interdependent markets: the role of complements and substitutes
23. 4.4.External costs over time4.5.Applications
24. 4.6.Final section
25. 5.Social cost of taxation
26. Contents note continued: 5.1.Introduction
27. 5.2.Economic theory and the MCF
28. 5.3.Estimates of the MCF
29. 5.4.Economic evaluations without an MCF
30. 5.5.Applications
31. 5.6.Final section

32. pt. III CEA AND CBA
33. 6.Fundamentals of cost-effectiveness analysis
34. 6.1.Introduction
35. 6.2.Basic principles of CEA
36. 6.3.Estimating effects using randomized controlled trials
37. 6.4.Methods for converting a CEA into a CBA
38. 6.5.Applications
39. 6.6.Final section
40. 7.Further issues of cost-effectiveness analysis
41. 7.1.Introduction
42. 7.2.Discounting in CEA
43. 7.3.Sampling error and uncertainty about estimates
44. 7.4.Applications
45. 7.5.Final section

pt. IV CUA AND CBA
46. 8.Fundamentals of cost
47. utility analysis
48. 8.1.Introduction
49. 8.2.Basic principles of CUA
50. 8.3.CUA versus CBA
51. 8.4.Applications
52. 8.5.Final section
53. 9.Measuring utilities in cost
54. 9.1.Introduction
55. 9.2.Main measurement sources
56. 9.3.Main measurement methods
57. 9.4.The EUROQOL
58. Contents note continued: 9.5.Markov modelling
59. 9.6.Applications
60. 9.7.Final section
61. 10.Cost
62. utility analysis and equity
63. 10.1.Introduction
64. 10.2.DALYs
65. 10.3.QALYs and ageism
66. 10.4.The person trade-off
67. 10.5.The capability approach
68. 10.6.Applications
69. 10.7.Final section

70. pt. V CBA
71. 11.Cost
72. benefit analysis and the human capital approach
73. 11.1.Introduction
74. 11.2.Human capital approach
75. 11.3.The relation between WTP and human capital
76. 11.4.Using time as the numeraire
77. 11.5.Putting a price on a QALY
78. 11.6.Applications
79. 11.7.Final section
80. 12.Cost
81. benefit analysis and willingness to pay
82. 12.1.Introduction
83. 12.2.WTP and consumer sovereignty
84. 12.3.WTP and willingness to accept compensation
85. 12.4.WTP and rationing by time
86. 12.5.Applications
87. 12.6.Final section
88. 13.Cost
89. benefit analysis and equity
90. 13.1.Introduction
91. 13.2.Distribution weights
92. 13.3.Numbers effect
93. 13.4.Applications
94. 13.5.Final section
95. Contents note continued:

pt. VI SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
96. 14.Methods for measuring the benefits of HIV/AIDS interventions
97. 14.1.Introduction
14.2.Measuring the benefits of HIV/AIDS interventions
98. 14.3.Final section.



Cost-benefit analysis is the only method of economic evaluation that can effectively indicate whether a health care treatment or intervention is worthwhile. In this thoroughly updated and revised second edition, Robert Brent expands the scope of the field by including the latest concepts and applications throughout all regions of the world. This book attempts to strengthen the link between cost-benefit analysis and the mainstream health care evaluation field, which is dominated by non-economists. The need to build a bridge between the two is more important than ever before, as the general understanding of cost-benefit analysis appears to have regressed"--Publisher's description.

http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/cost-benefit-analysis-and-health-care-evaluations-second-edition

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