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The problem of HFT: collected writings on high frequency trading & stock market

By: Bodek, Haim.
Publisher: United States Decimus Capital Markets 2013Description: 101 p.ISBN: 9781481978354.Subject(s): Electronic trading of securities | Investment analysis | Investments - Moral and ethical aspects - United States | Stock exchanges - United StatesDDC classification: 332.64 Summary: This book explores the problem of high frequency trading (HFT) as well as the need for US stock market reform. This collection of previously published and unpublished materials includes the following articles and white papers: 1. The Problem of HFT - explains how HFTs came to dominate US equity markets by exploiting artificial advantages introduced by electronic exchanges that catered to HFT strategies 2. HFT Scalping Strategies - describes the primary features of modern HFT strategies currently active in US equities as well as the benefits these strategies extract from the maker-taker market model and the regulatory framework of the national market system 3. Why HFTs Have an Advantage - explains the critical importance of HFT-oriented special order types and exchange order matching engine practices in the operation of modern HFT strategies 4. HFT - A Systemic Issue - a discussion of the latest industry and regulatory developments with regard to exchange order matching practices that serve to advantage HFTs over the public customer 5. Electronic Liquidity Strategy - proposes a conceptual framework for institutional traders to achieve superior execution performance in HFT-oriented electronic market venues 6. Reforming the National Market System - proposes a 10-step plan for strengthening the operation of the US equities marketplace in order to serve the needs of long-term investors 7. NZZ Interview with Haim Bodek - addresses current topics and proposals for US equities market structure reforms 8. TradeTech Interview with Haim Bodek - addresses the current status of the HFT special order type debate
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Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 705 (0 Floor, West Wing) Non-fiction 332.64 B6P7 (Browse shelf) Available 181570

This book explores the problem of high frequency trading (HFT) as well as the need for US stock market reform. This collection of previously published and unpublished materials includes the following articles and white papers:


1. The Problem of HFT - explains how HFTs came to dominate US equity markets by exploiting artificial advantages introduced by electronic exchanges that catered to HFT strategies

2. HFT Scalping Strategies - describes the primary features of modern HFT strategies currently active in US equities as well as the benefits these strategies extract from the maker-taker market model and the regulatory framework of the national market system

3. Why HFTs Have an Advantage - explains the critical importance of HFT-oriented special order types and exchange order matching engine practices in the operation of modern HFT strategies

4. HFT - A Systemic Issue - a discussion of the latest industry and regulatory developments with regard to exchange order matching practices that serve to advantage HFTs over the public customer

5. Electronic Liquidity Strategy - proposes a conceptual framework for institutional traders to achieve superior execution performance in HFT-oriented electronic market venues

6. Reforming the National Market System - proposes a 10-step plan for strengthening the operation of the US equities marketplace in order to serve the needs of long-term investors

7. NZZ Interview with Haim Bodek - addresses current topics and proposals for US equities market structure reforms

8. TradeTech Interview with Haim Bodek - addresses the current status of the HFT special order type debate

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