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The mangle of practice: time, agency and science

By: Pickering, Andrew.
Publisher: Chicago The University of Chicago Press 1995Description: xiv, 281 p.ISBN: 9780226668031.Subject(s): General | Science - Philosophy | Science - Social aspectsDDC classification: 501 Summary: This ambitious book by one of the most original and provocative thinkers in science studies offers a sophisticated new understanding of the nature of scientific, mathematical, and engineering practice and the production of scientific knowledge.Andrew Pickering offers a new approach to the unpredictable nature of change in science, taking into account the extraordinary number of factors—social, technological, conceptual, and natural—that interact to affect the creation of scientific knowledge. In his view, machines, instruments, facts, theories, conceptual and mathematical structures, disciplined practices, and human beings are in constantly shifting relationships with one another—"mangled" together in unforeseeable ways that are shaped by the contingencies of culture, time, and place. (http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo3642386.html)
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Slot 1326 (0 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 501 P4M2 (Browse shelf) Available 178702

Includes bibliographical references(p. 253-273) and index.

This ambitious book by one of the most original and provocative thinkers in science studies offers a sophisticated new understanding of the nature of scientific, mathematical, and engineering practice and the production of scientific knowledge.Andrew Pickering offers a new approach to the unpredictable nature of change in science, taking into account the extraordinary number of factors—social, technological, conceptual, and natural—that interact to affect the creation of scientific knowledge. In his view, machines, instruments, facts, theories, conceptual and mathematical structures, disciplined practices, and human beings are in constantly shifting relationships with one another—"mangled" together in unforeseeable ways that are shaped by the contingencies of culture, time, and place.
(http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo3642386.html)

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