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Ghetto at the center of the world: Chungkansions, Hing Mong Kong

By: Mathews, Gordon.
Publisher: Chicago The University of Chicago Press 2011Description: xi, 241 p.ISBN: 9780226510200.Subject(s): General | Chungking Mansions (Hong Kong, China) | Multipurpose buildings - China - Hong Kong | Guesthouses - China - Hong Kong | City dwellers - China - Hong Kong | Minorities - China - Hong Kong | Hong Kong (China) - CommerceDDC classification: 951.25 Summary: Ghetto at the Center of the World shows us, a trip to Chungking Mansions reveals a far less glamorous side of globalization. A world away from the gleaming headquarters of multinational corporations, Chungking Mansions is emblematic of the way globalization actually works for most of the world’s people. Gordon Mathews’s intimate portrayal of the building’s polyethnic residents lays bare their intricate connections to the international circulation of goods, money, and ideas. We come to understand the day-to-day realities of globalization through the stories of entrepreneurs from Africa carting cell phones in their luggage to sell back home and temporary workers from South Asia struggling to earn money to bring to their families. And we see that this so-called ghetto—which inspires fear in many of Hong Kong’s other residents, despite its low crime rate—is not a place of darkness and desperation but a beacon of hope.
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Item type Current location Item location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 2422 (3 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 951.25 M2G4 (Browse shelf) Available 178891

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Ghetto at the Center of the World shows us, a trip to Chungking Mansions reveals a far less glamorous side of globalization. A world away from the gleaming headquarters of multinational corporations, Chungking Mansions is emblematic of the way globalization actually works for most of the world’s people. Gordon Mathews’s intimate portrayal of the building’s polyethnic residents lays bare their intricate connections to the international circulation of goods, money, and ideas. We come to understand the day-to-day realities of globalization through the stories of entrepreneurs from Africa carting cell phones in their luggage to sell back home and temporary workers from South Asia struggling to earn money to bring to their families. And we see that this so-called ghetto—which inspires fear in many of Hong Kong’s other residents, despite its low crime rate—is not a place of darkness and desperation but a beacon of hope.

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