The ambassadors' club: the Indian diplomat at large

Contributor(s): [Rajan, Krishna V.]
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New Delhi Harper Collins Publishers India 2012Description: xx, 330 p. ISBN: 9789350290972Subject(s): Ambassadors - India | Diplomats - India - Biography | India - Foreign relations | Indian agentsDDC classification: 327.2092 Summary: In 1972, in what appeared a whimsical decision at first, Idi Amin, the dictator of Uganda, declared that all Asians holding citizenship of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh or the UK would be expelled from the country within three months. As he put it, mistakenly, �Asians milked the cow, but did not feed it to yield more milk.� It was the beginning of a nightmarish five months for Niranjan Desai, who had been sent from India as officer on special duty to help tackle the crisis, as he tried to help people leaving possessions and attachments behind for an uncertain future, watched a country in turmoil where people vanished overnight, and was himself declared persona non grata and put at some risk to his life. But as he learnt from the experience, rules and regulations are secondary and merely a guide while helping people in distress. Sometimes, when there is no opportunity for the observance of diplomatic niceties, it is common sense that counts. (http://harpercollins.co.in/BookDetail.asp?Book_Code=3284)
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Slot 480 (0 Floor, West Wing) 327.2092 A6 (Browse shelf) Available 176152

In 1972, in what appeared a whimsical decision at first, Idi Amin, the dictator of Uganda, declared that all Asians holding citizenship of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh or the UK would be expelled from the country within three months. As he put it, mistakenly, �Asians milked the cow, but did not feed it to yield more milk.� It was the beginning of a nightmarish five months for Niranjan Desai, who had been sent from India as officer on special duty to help tackle the crisis, as he tried to help people leaving possessions and attachments behind for an uncertain future, watched a country in turmoil where people vanished overnight, and was himself declared persona non grata and put at some risk to his life. But as he learnt from the experience, rules and regulations are secondary and merely a guide while helping people in distress. Sometimes, when there is no opportunity for the observance of diplomatic niceties, it is common sense that counts. (http://harpercollins.co.in/BookDetail.asp?Book_Code=3284)

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