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The Oxford companion to world mythology

By: Leeming, David.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Oxford Oxford University Press 2005Description: xxxvii, 469 p., ill. (some col.ISBN: 9780195156690.Subject(s): Mythology - EncyclopediasDDC classification: 201.3 Summary: In the Oxford Companion to World Mythology , David Leeming explores the role of mythology, or myth-logic, in history and determines that the dreams of specific cultures add up to a larger collective story of humanity. Stopping short of attempting to be all-inclusive, this fascinating volume will nonetheless be comprehensive, opening with an introduction exploring the nature and dimensions of myth and proposing a definition as a universal language. Briefly dipping into the ways our understanding of myth has changed from Aristotle and Plato to modern scholars such as Joseph Campbell, the introduction loosely places the concept in its present context and precedes articles on influential mythologists and mythological approaches that appear later in the Companion.(http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/ReligionTheology/MythologyFolklore/?view=usa&ci=9780195156690)
List(s) this item appears in: Mythology | VR_Mythology
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In the Oxford Companion to World Mythology , David Leeming explores the role of mythology, or myth-logic, in history and determines that the dreams of specific cultures add up to a larger collective story of humanity. Stopping short of attempting to be all-inclusive, this fascinating volume will nonetheless be comprehensive, opening with an introduction exploring the nature and dimensions of myth and proposing a definition as a universal language. Briefly dipping into the ways our understanding of myth has changed from Aristotle and Plato to modern scholars such as Joseph Campbell, the introduction loosely places the concept in its present context and precedes articles on influential mythologists and mythological approaches that appear later in the Companion.(http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/ReligionTheology/MythologyFolklore/?view=usa&ci=9780195156690)

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