Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Everyday life in a prison: confinement, surveillance, resistance

By: Bandyopadhyay, Mahuya.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi Orient Blackswan 2010Description: xvii, 332 p.ISBN: 9788125038337.Subject(s): PrisonDDC classification: 365.60954147 Summary: Based on intensive fieldwork in a central prison in kolkata, this book succinctly addresses issues in the sociology of institutions and organisations it demystifies the image of the prison as an presenting a close understanding of lives and practices within its four walls the book finds answers to such questions as: is the prison a negative space? does meaningful life cease to exist in a prison? are there aspects of life of which prisoners are unable to make sense? what does the construction of meaningful worlds mean for organisational practice and goals? how do everyday life, organisational practice and goals interact and what are the implications of this interaction for the nature of the organisation and the quality of prison life? the author thus constructs the prison as a space where inmates make meaningful social worlds that emerge out of despair marking a departure from the existing sociological studies on prisons in india, everyday life in a prison: confinement, surveillance, re
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 1199 (0 Floor, East Wing) 365.60954147 B2E9 (Browse shelf) Available 170225

Based on intensive fieldwork in a central prison in kolkata, this book succinctly addresses issues in the sociology of institutions and organisations it demystifies the image of the prison as an presenting a close understanding of lives and practices within its four walls the book finds answers to such questions as: is the prison a negative space? does meaningful life cease to exist in a prison? are there aspects of life of which prisoners are unable to make sense? what does the construction of meaningful worlds mean for organisational practice and goals? how do everyday life, organisational practice and goals interact and what are the implications of this interaction for the nature of the organisation and the quality of prison life? the author thus constructs the prison as a space where inmates make meaningful social worlds that emerge out of despair marking a departure from the existing sociological studies on prisons in india, everyday life in a prison: confinement, surveillance, re

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha