Gandhi is gone who will guide us now ?: Nehru Prasad Azad Vinoba Kripalani J.P. and others introspect Sevagram March 1948

Contributor(s): Gandhi, Gopalkrishna [Editor] | Gandhi, Gopal [Translator] | Snell, Rupert [Translator]
Publisher: Ranikhet Permanent Black 2007Description: 192 p.ISBN: 9788178242545Subject(s): Gandhi Mahatma - 1869-1948 - Friends and associates - Anecdotes | India - Politics and government - 1947-DDC classification: 954.035 Summary: As India became free on 15 August 1947 and Jawaharlal Nehru became the First Prime Minister of the Country the larger Gandhi Family comprising the political and non political associates of the Mahatma needed to think through their future equations. Was a dividing line to be drawn between those who had entered public office and those who continued to do constructive work. The Mahatma had planned a discussion on this and in his meticulous manner identified the venue and date for the meeting which he intended to attend in Sevagram on 2 February 1948. But thanks primarily to Rajendra Prasad and Vinoba Bhave the proposed conference did take place after a slight deferment in March 1948. Without the Mahatma the meeting acquired a new theme Gandhi is Gone. Who Will Guide Us Now? The record of discussions at the conference was typed out for limited circulation amongst the participants. The deliberations were largely in Hindustani with the subject of India's Future Lingua Franca itself being one of the subjects of discussion. The record of that conference unknown to the world until now forms a fascinating document. The Gandhian legacy and how to further it is discussed threadbare from numerous perspectives. Industrialization militarization communalism and the plight of refugees from Pakistan are among the subjects discussed. Published here for the first time sixty years on the discussions of that conference remain amazingly pertinent stimulating and challenging today. This book is indispensable for anyone interested in Gandhi his legacy and the history of modern India. (Source: www.alibris.com)
List(s) this item appears in: Gandhiji | Mahatma gandhi | Book Display on Gandhi | Books on Mahatma Gandhi_All
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Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 2436 (3 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 954.035 G2 (Browse shelf) Available 169435

Translated from hindi

As India became free on 15 August 1947 and Jawaharlal Nehru became the First Prime Minister of the Country the larger Gandhi Family comprising the political and non political associates of the Mahatma needed to think through their future equations. Was a dividing line to be drawn between those who had entered public office and those who continued to do constructive work. The Mahatma had planned a discussion on this and in his meticulous manner identified the venue and date for the meeting which he intended to attend in Sevagram on 2 February 1948. But thanks primarily to Rajendra Prasad and Vinoba Bhave the proposed conference did take place after a slight deferment in March 1948. Without the Mahatma the meeting acquired a new theme Gandhi is Gone. Who Will Guide Us Now? The record of discussions at the conference was typed out for limited circulation amongst the participants. The deliberations were largely in Hindustani with the subject of India's Future Lingua Franca itself being one of the subjects of discussion. The record of that conference unknown to the world until now forms a fascinating document. The Gandhian legacy and how to further it is discussed threadbare from numerous perspectives. Industrialization militarization communalism and the plight of refugees from Pakistan are among the subjects discussed. Published here for the first time sixty years on the discussions of that conference remain amazingly pertinent stimulating and challenging today. This book is indispensable for anyone interested in Gandhi his legacy and the history of modern India. (Source: www.alibris.com)

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