Women and labour in late colonial India: the Bengal jute industry

By: Sen, Samita
Series: Cambridge studies in Indian history and society ; 3Publisher: Cambridge, New York Cambridge University Press 1999Description: xviii, 265 p ISBN: 9780521453639Subject(s): Women --Employment --India --Bengal | Women --India --Bengal --Social conditions | Women --India --Bengal --Economic conditions | Jute industry --India --BengalDDC classification: 331.4095414 Summary: Samita Sen's history of labouring women in Calcutta in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries considers how social constructions of gender shaped their lives. Dr Sen demonstrates how - in contrast to the experience of their male counterparts - the long-term trends in the Indian economy devalued women's labour, establishing patterns of urban migration and changing gender equations within the family. She relates these trends to the spread of dowry, enforced widowhood and child marriage. The book provides insight into the lives of poor urban women who were often perceived as prostitutes or social pariahs. Even trade unions refused to address their problems and they remained on the margins of organised political protest. The study will make a significant contribution to the understanding of the social and economic history of colonial India and to notions of gender construction. (Source: LOC Publishers description)
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Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 589 (0 Floor, West Wing) 331.4095414 S3W6 (Browse shelf) Available 169317

Includes bibliographical references (p. 248-263) and index.

Samita Sen's history of labouring women in Calcutta in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries considers how social constructions of gender shaped their lives. Dr Sen demonstrates how - in contrast to the experience of their male counterparts - the long-term trends in the Indian economy devalued women's labour, establishing patterns of urban migration and changing gender equations within the family. She relates these trends to the spread of dowry, enforced widowhood and child marriage. The book provides insight into the lives of poor urban women who were often perceived as prostitutes or social pariahs. Even trade unions refused to address their problems and they remained on the margins of organised political protest. The study will make a significant contribution to the understanding of the social and economic history of colonial India and to notions of gender construction. (Source: LOC Publishers description)

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