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The cost of capitalism: understanding market mayhem and stabilizing our economic future

By: Barbera, Robert J.
Publisher: New Delhi Tata McGrawHill Education Private Limited 2009Description: xviii, 246 p.ISBN: 9780070147133.Subject(s): Capitalism | Financial crises | Economic stabilizationDDC classification: 338.543 Summary: While mainstream financial analysts are stringing together ad hoc explanations for the financial crisis of 2008, a relatively small group of economists saw this coming. In The Cost of Capitalism, Robert J. Barbera explains why. Barbera makes the case that investors and policy-makers can reduce the risk of truly gruesome outcomes if they better plan for the violent economic storms, which history confirms is always over the horizon. Investors will learn how to gird themselves for the roller-coaster ride that is free market capitalism; policy makers will find out how to plan for crises they know will occur at some point; and academic economists will rethink their pursuit of ever more elaborate mathematical models that bear no resemblance to the real world. The message is simple: Stop pretending that people are always rational and that markets are always efficient and be prepared for market mayhem. (Source: www.alibris.com)
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Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 920 (0 Floor, East Wing) 338.543 B2C6 (Browse shelf) Available 168318

While mainstream financial analysts are stringing together ad hoc explanations for the financial crisis of 2008, a relatively small group of economists saw this coming. In The Cost of Capitalism, Robert J. Barbera explains why. Barbera makes the case that investors and policy-makers can reduce the risk of truly gruesome outcomes if they better plan for the violent economic storms, which history confirms is always over the horizon. Investors will learn how to gird themselves for the roller-coaster ride that is free market capitalism; policy makers will find out how to plan for crises they know will occur at some point; and academic economists will rethink their pursuit of ever more elaborate mathematical models that bear no resemblance to the real world. The message is simple: Stop pretending that people are always rational and that markets are always efficient and be prepared for market mayhem. (Source: www.alibris.com)

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