Traffic: why we drive the way we do (and what it says about us) Vanderbilt, Tom

By: Vanderbilt, Tom
Publisher: New Delhi Penguin Books India Pvt.Ltd. 2008Description: viii, 402 p.ISBN: 9780713999327Subject(s): Automobile driving - Psychological aspects | Traffic congestionDDC classification: 629.283 Summary: This book is, primarily, a demonstration, with dozens of examples, of the counterintuitive truth about traffic. New cars, for example, crash more than old ones. Nobody knows why, but it may simply be that people drive them more than their old ones. The average round-trip commute time is consistent throughout the world - 1.1 hours. The stop-sign system in America is more dangerous than no system at all and, compared to British roundabouts, is lethal. Road deaths are related to poverty - as people get richer they have more time to devote to not dying. But Belgium, mysteriously, has a much worse traffic-death rate than equally rich and apparently similar Holland. It is thought that this is because Belgium is more corrupt and corruption reduces respect for the law so driving behaviour deteriorates. Older drivers are less likely to crash if they have passengers in the car, but teens are more likely - they get drunk and dance to the music like the hairy guys rocking to Queen in Wayne's World.
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Slot 1763 (2 Floor, East Wing) 629.283 V2T7 (Browse shelf) Available 166309

Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-383) and index.

This book is, primarily, a demonstration, with dozens of examples, of the counterintuitive truth about traffic. New cars, for example, crash more than old ones. Nobody knows why, but it may simply be that people drive them more than their old ones. The average round-trip commute time is consistent throughout the world - 1.1 hours. The stop-sign system in America is more dangerous than no system at all and, compared to British roundabouts, is lethal. Road deaths are related to poverty - as people get richer they have more time to devote to not dying. But Belgium, mysteriously, has a much worse traffic-death rate than equally rich and apparently similar Holland. It is thought that this is because Belgium is more corrupt and corruption reduces respect for the law so driving behaviour deteriorates. Older drivers are less likely to crash if they have passengers in the car, but teens are more likely - they get drunk and dance to the music like the hairy guys rocking to Queen in Wayne's World.

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