Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Introduction to calculus and classical analysis

By: Hijab, Omar.
Publisher: New York Springer Science+Business Media 2007Edition: 2nd ed.Description: x, 337 p.ISBN: 9780387693156.Subject(s): Calculus | Mathematical analysisDDC classification: 515 Summary: This text is intended for an honors calculus course or for an introduction to analysis. Involving rigorous analysis, computational dexterity, and a breadth of applications, it is ideal for undergraduate majors. This second edition includes corrections as well as some additional material. Some features of the text: The text is completely self-contained and starts with the real number axioms; the integral is defined as the area under the graph, while the area is defined for every subset of the plane; there is a heavy emphasis on computational problems, from the high-school quadratic formula to the formula for the derivative of the zeta function at zero; there are applications from many parts of analysis, e.g., convexity, the Cantor set, continued fractions, the AGM, the theta and zeta functions, transcendental numbers, the Bessel and gamma functions, and many more; traditionally transcendentally presented material, such as infinite products, the Bernoulli series, and the zeta functional equation, is developed over the reals; there are 366 problems.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 1372 (0 Floor, East Wing) 515 H4I6/2007 (Browse shelf) Available 165618

This text is intended for an honors calculus course or for an introduction to analysis. Involving rigorous analysis, computational dexterity, and a breadth of applications, it is ideal for undergraduate majors. This second edition includes corrections as well as some additional material. Some features of the text: The text is completely self-contained and starts with the real number axioms; the integral is defined as the area under the graph, while the area is defined for every subset of the plane; there is a heavy emphasis on computational problems, from the high-school quadratic formula to the formula for the derivative of the zeta function at zero; there are applications from many parts of analysis, e.g., convexity, the Cantor set, continued fractions, the AGM, the theta and zeta functions, transcendental numbers, the Bessel and gamma functions, and many more; traditionally transcendentally presented material, such as infinite products, the Bernoulli series, and the zeta functional equation, is developed over the reals; there are 366 problems.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha