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Capital accumulation and workers' struggle in Indian industrialisation: the case of Tata Iron and Steel Company 1910-1970

By: Datta, Satya Brata.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Culcutta K.P. Bagchi & Company 1990Description: xii, 298 p.ISBN: 817074038X.Subject(s): Industrial relations - India | Steel industry and trade - India | Saving and investmentDDC classification: 331.10954 Summary: The general aim of this inquiry is to reconstitute some specific features of Indian industrial history by studying capital labour relations evolving in the immediate production process.It is my convention that such a study will help to gain mew insights into the evolution of an underdeveloped economy. 1 in the course of its industrialization. The point of issue is that the process of industrialization. 2 whatever its limited extent, has undeniably become an integral part of structural transformation that Indian economy has been undergoing, not least since the early decades of this century.This is not a new issue, but it deserves examination from a critical perspective still inadequately represented in the studies of Indian industrial history.
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KLMDC 331.10954 D2C2 (Browse shelf) Available 123519

The general aim of this inquiry is to reconstitute some specific features of Indian industrial history by studying capital labour relations evolving in the immediate production process.It is my convention that such a study will help to gain mew insights into the evolution of an underdeveloped economy.
1 in the course of its industrialization. The point of issue is that the process of industrialization.
2 whatever its limited extent, has undeniably become an integral part of structural transformation that Indian economy has been undergoing, not least since the early decades of this century.This is not a new issue, but it deserves examination from a critical perspective still inadequately represented in the studies of Indian industrial history.

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