Impact of sea level rise on developing countries: a comparative analysis (Record no. 67828)

000 -LEADER
fixed length control field 02526nam a2200193Ia 4500
008 - FIXED-LENGTH DATA ELEMENTS--GENERAL INFORMATION
fixed length control field 140323b2005 xxu||||| |||| 00| 0 eng d
082 ## - DEWEY DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION NUMBER
Classification number ER30
100 ## - MAIN ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Dasgupta, Susmita
9 (RLIN) 18206
245 ## - TITLE STATEMENT
Title Impact of sea level rise on developing countries: a comparative analysis
Statement of responsibility, etc. Dasgupta, Susmita
260 ## - PUBLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, ETC. (IMPRINT)
Place of publication, distribution, etc. Washington, D.C.
Name of publisher, distributor, etc. World Bank
Date of publication, distribution, etc. 2005
300 ## - PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
Extent N.P
520 ## - SUMMARY, ETC.
Summary, etc. Sea level rise (SLR) due to climate change is a serious global threat. The scientific evidence is now overwhelming. Continued growth of greenhouse gas emissions and associated global warming could well promote SLR of 1m-3m in this century, and unexpectedly rapid breakup of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets might produce a 5m SLR. In this paper, the authors have assessed the consequences of continued SLR for 84 developing countries. Geographic Information System (GIS) software has been used to overlay the best available, spatially-disaggregated global data on critical impact elements (land, population, agriculture, urban extent, wetlands, and GDP) with the inundation zones projected for 1-5m SLR. The results reveal that hundreds of millions of people in the developing world are likely to be displaced by SLR within this century, and accompanying economic and ecological damage will be severe for many. At the country level, results are extremely skewed, with severe impacts limited to a relatively small number of countries. For these countries (such as Vietnam, A. R. of Egypt, and The Bahamas), however, the consequences of SLR are potentially catastrophic. For many others, including some of the largest (such as China), the absolute magnitudes of potential impacts are very large. At the other extreme, many developing countries experience limited impacts. Among regions, East Asia and the Middle East and North Africa exhibit the greatest relative impacts. To date, there is little evidence that the international community has seriously considered the implications of SLR for population location and infrastructure planning in developing countries. The authors hope that the information provided in this paper will encourage immediate planning for adaptation
650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Wetlands
9 (RLIN) 36044
650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Climate Change
9 (RLIN) 32665
650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Geographical Information Systems
9 (RLIN) 70185
700 ## - ADDED ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Laplante, Benoit
9 (RLIN) 49228
856 ## - ELECTRONIC LOCATION AND ACCESS
Access method Unlimited (Intranet)
Materials specified E-book
Uniform Resource Identifier <a href="http://192.168.251.40/vsl/er/ER030.pdf">http://192.168.251.40/vsl/er/ER030.pdf</a>
942 ## - ADDED ENTRY ELEMENTS (KOHA)
Koha item type eBooks
952 ## - LOCATION AND ITEM INFORMATION (KOHA)
-- 00000.00
-- INR
-- 04/07/2007
-- World Bank
Holdings
Withdrawn status Lost status Source of classification or shelving scheme Damaged status Not for loan Collection code Permanent Location Current Location Shelving location Date acquired Full call number Barcode Date last seen Price effective from Koha item type
          Reference Vikram Sarabhai Library Vikram Sarabhai Library Electronic Resources 05/05/2009 ER30 ER000030 04/09/2009 04/09/2009 eBooks

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