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Indigenous knowledge and innovations for managing resources, institutions and technologies sustainably: a case of agriculture, medicinal plants and biotechnology by Anil K. Gupta (

By: Gupta, Anil K.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management 2007Description: 20 p.Subject(s): Agriculture | Medicinal plants | Indigenous Knowledge | Technological innovationsDDC classification: WP 2007-07-09 (2054) Summary: Communities living close to nature invariably evolve a language to understand and interpret the variations and discontinuities in nature. A flower of new colour, an unusually tall plant, an unseasonal germination or an extraordinary fruiting have attracted human attention in every part of the world. Some of these odd plants got selected either for curiosity or for a purposive characteristic and became a local crop variety. Some got analysed for their therapeutic property and became a medicinal plant. Some were combined with other plants, insects, fungi or other materials such as animal urine, milk, minerals or other compounds to develop various kinds of biotechnological products useful as drugs, dyes or derivatives. It is not surprising therefore that civilizational societies whether in Latin America or Asia or Africa have had a tremendously rich knowledge base drawing upon local resources.
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Working Paper Vikram Sarabhai Library
WP 2007-07-09 (2054) (Browse shelf) Available WP002054

Communities living close to nature invariably evolve a language to understand and interpret the variations and discontinuities in nature. A flower of new colour, an unusually tall plant, an unseasonal germination or an extraordinary fruiting have attracted human attention in every part of the world. Some of these odd plants got selected either for curiosity or for a purposive characteristic and became a local crop variety. Some got analysed for their therapeutic property and became a medicinal plant. Some were combined with other plants, insects, fungi or other materials such as animal urine, milk, minerals or other compounds to develop various kinds of biotechnological products useful as drugs, dyes or derivatives. It is not surprising therefore that civilizational societies whether in Latin America or Asia or Africa have had a tremendously rich knowledge base drawing upon local resources.

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