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Cooperatives and rationalisation of Indian agriculture by V K Gupta and T M Gajanana (Working Paper, No. 1990/881)

By: Gupta, V. K.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management 1990Description: 20 p.Subject(s): Rationalisation | Cooperatives | Agriculture - IndiaDDC classification: WP 1990 (881) Summary: Indian economy is still predominantly agrarian and over 70 per cent of the workforce is still engaged in agriculture. Small and marginal farmers predominate the agricultural scenario in India. However, relative neglect of agriculture in the recent past has resulted in its dwindling share in net national product (NDP). This decline has been the result of declining productivity of agricultural inputs. Investment in agriculture (as is evident from gross capital formation (GCF) in agriculture) has also declined considerable during the 80s. Added to this is the adverse terms of trade and the growing unemployment in agriculture. Further, share of agriculture in total export earnings has also been going down. However, production and productivity requirements are going to be of a high order by 2000 A.D. In such a deteriorating situation, rationalization of Indian agriculture becomes very important. An attempt is made in this paper to examine as to how cooperatives can arrest this trend and bring prosperity to farmers besides accelerating the pace of economic development.
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Working Paper Vikram Sarabhai Library
WP 1990 (881) (Browse shelf) Available WP000881

Indian economy is still predominantly agrarian and over 70 per cent of the workforce is still engaged in agriculture. Small and marginal farmers predominate the agricultural scenario in India. However, relative neglect of agriculture in the recent past has resulted in its dwindling share in net national product (NDP). This decline has been the result of declining productivity of agricultural inputs. Investment in agriculture (as is evident from gross capital formation (GCF) in agriculture) has also declined considerable during the 80s. Added to this is the adverse terms of trade and the growing unemployment in agriculture. Further, share of agriculture in total export earnings has also been going down. However, production and productivity requirements are going to be of a high order by 2000 A.D. In such a deteriorating situation, rationalization of Indian agriculture becomes very important. An attempt is made in this paper to examine as to how cooperatives can arrest this trend and bring prosperity to farmers besides accelerating the pace of economic development.

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