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The mismanagement of talent: employability and jobs in the knowledge economy

By: Brown, Phillip.
Contributor(s): Hesketh, Anthony | Williams, Sara.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi Oxford University Press 2004Description: viii, 278 p.ISBN: 9780199269549.Subject(s): Employee selection | Labour supply - Effect of education on | Labour supply - Effect of Technological innovations on | College graduates - Employment | Career developmentDDC classification: 658.311 Summary: This book lifts the veneer of 'employability', to expose serious problems in the way that future workers are trying to manage their employability in the competition for tough-entry jobs in the knowledge economy; in how companies understand their human resource strategies and endeavor to recruit the managers and leaders of the future; and in the government failure to come to terms with the realities of the knowledge-based economy. The demand for high-skilled, high waged jobs, has been exaggerated. But it is something that governments want to believe because it distracts attention from thorny political issues around equality, opportunity, and redistribution. If it is assumed that there are plenty of good jobs for people with the appropriate credentials then the issue of who gets the best jobs loses its political sting.
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Slot 1934 (2 Floor, East Wing) 658.311 B7M4 (Browse shelf) Available 159057

This book lifts the veneer of 'employability', to expose serious problems in the way that future workers are trying to manage their employability in the competition for tough-entry jobs in the knowledge economy; in how companies understand their human resource strategies and endeavor to recruit the managers and leaders of the future; and in the government failure to come to terms with the realities of the knowledge-based economy. The demand for high-skilled, high waged jobs, has been exaggerated. But it is something that governments want to believe because it distracts attention from thorny political issues around equality, opportunity, and redistribution. If it is assumed that there are plenty of good jobs for people with the appropriate credentials then the issue of who gets the best jobs loses its political sting.

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