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Ensuring sustainable livelihoods: challenge for governments, corporate and civil society at RIO + 10

By: Delhi Sustainable Development Summit New Delhi 8 - 11 February 2002 | Proceedings of the conference on Ensuring Sustainable Livelihoods: Challenge for Governments, Corporate and Civil Society at Rio + 10.
Contributor(s): Pachauri, R. K.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi TERI 2002Description: xvi, 411 p.ISBN: 8179930025.Subject(s): Sustainable development | Environmental policy | Environmental justiceDDC classification: 333.72 Summary: The concept of sustainable development dates back a long way but it was at the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment at Stockholm in 1972 that the international community came together for the first time to focus on global environmental and developmental issues. The Conference brought into focus the enormity of issues related to environmental degradation and ‘trans boundary pollution’ and galvanized public opinion around environmental concerns. The Conference led to the creation of the United Nations Environment Programme. Over the years, the urgency for concerted international action to address trans boundary environmental problems, such as depletion of the ozone layer, climate change, management of ocean and freshwater resources, land degradation, and depleting biological diversity gained further momentum. At that juncture, it was also recognized that environmental betterment could not be divorced from socio-economic development. Underdevelopment is both an agent and a victim of environmental damage – population growth, paucity of resources, and lack of economic opportunities would create pressures on ecologically fragile areas and natural resources. These, in turn, could jeopardize growth in the long run. Growing interdependence amongst nations also meant that by adversely affecting the economic base and social fabric in poor countries, local environmental pressures could impact the political, economic, and social interests of the world as a whole.
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The concept of sustainable development dates back a long way but it was at the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment at Stockholm in 1972 that the international community came together for the first time to focus on global environmental and developmental issues. The Conference brought into focus the enormity of issues related to environmental degradation and ‘trans boundary pollution’ and galvanized public opinion around environmental concerns. The Conference led to the creation of the United Nations Environment Programme. Over the years, the urgency for concerted international action to address trans boundary environmental problems, such as depletion of the ozone layer, climate change, management of ocean and
freshwater resources, land degradation, and depleting biological diversity gained further momentum. At that juncture, it was also recognized that environmental betterment could not be divorced from socio-economic development. Underdevelopment is both an agent and a victim of environmental damage – population growth, paucity of resources, and lack of economic opportunities would create pressures on ecologically fragile areas and natural resources. These, in turn, could jeopardize growth in the long run. Growing interdependence amongst nations also meant that by adversely affecting the economic base and social fabric in poor countries, local environmental pressures could impact the political, economic, and social interests of the world as a whole.

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