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Rulers, religion, and riches: why the west got rich and the middle east did not

By: Rubin, Jared.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Cambridge studies in economics, choice and society. Publisher: New York Cambridge University Press 2017Description: xxi, 273p. With index.ISBN: 9781108400053.Subject(s): Middle east | Western Europe | Economics--religious aspects | Economic historyDDC classification: 330.94 Summary: For centuries following the spread of Islam, the Middle East was far ahead of Europe. Yet, the modern economy was born in Europe. Why was it not born in the Middle East? In this book Jared Rubin examines the role that Islam played in this reversal of fortunes. It argues that the religion itself is not to blame; the importance of religious legitimacy in Middle Eastern politics was the primary culprit. Muslim religious authorities were given an important seat at the political bargaining table, which they used to block important advancements such as the printing press and lending at interest. In Europe, however, the Church played a weaker role in legitimizing rule, especially where Protestantism spread (indeed, the Reformation was successful due to the spread of printing, which was blocked in the Middle East). It was precisely in those Protestant nations, especially England and the Dutch Republic, where the modern economy was born. Verbalizes economic models, but avoids mathematics and econometrics, helping readers to understand the arguments without wading through mathematics Mixes modern economic techniques with historical narrative Avoids jargon, remaining accessible to readers outside economics. https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/economics/economic-development-and-growth/rulers-religion-and-riches-why-west-got-rich-and-middle-east-did-not?format=PB&isbn=9781108400053
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Slot 538 (0 Floor, West Wing) Non-fiction 330.94 R8R8 (Browse shelf) Checked out 20/08/2019 199129

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

Part I. Propagation of Rule: A Theory of Economic Success and Stagnation:
2. The propagation rule
3. Historical origins of rule propagation

Part II. Applying the Theory: Why the West Got Rich and the Middle East Did Not:
4. Bans on taking interest
5. Restrictions on the printing press
6. Printing and the Reformation
7. Success: England and the Dutch Republic
8. Stagnation: Spain and the Ottoman Empire
9. Conclusion.

For centuries following the spread of Islam, the Middle East was far ahead of Europe. Yet, the modern economy was born in Europe. Why was it not born in the Middle East? In this book Jared Rubin examines the role that Islam played in this reversal of fortunes. It argues that the religion itself is not to blame; the importance of religious legitimacy in Middle Eastern politics was the primary culprit. Muslim religious authorities were given an important seat at the political bargaining table, which they used to block important advancements such as the printing press and lending at interest. In Europe, however, the Church played a weaker role in legitimizing rule, especially where Protestantism spread (indeed, the Reformation was successful due to the spread of printing, which was blocked in the Middle East). It was precisely in those Protestant nations, especially England and the Dutch Republic, where the modern economy was born.
Verbalizes economic models, but avoids mathematics and econometrics, helping readers to understand the arguments without wading through mathematics
Mixes modern economic techniques with historical narrative
Avoids jargon, remaining accessible to readers outside economics.

https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/economics/economic-development-and-growth/rulers-religion-and-riches-why-west-got-rich-and-middle-east-did-not?format=PB&isbn=9781108400053

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