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Time in early modern Islam: calendar, ceremony and chronology in the Safavid, Mughal, and Ottoman empires

By: Blake, Stephen P.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi Cambridge University Press 2013Description: xiii, 209 p.ISBN: 9781108412803.Subject(s): Time - Religious aspects - Islam | Islamic calendar | Astronomy - Religious aspects - Islam | Islam - science | India - Mogul Empire | Ṣafavid Dynasty - Iran | Iran - TurkeyDDC classification: 529.327 Summary: The prophet Muhammad and the early Islamic community radically redefined the concept of time that they had inherited from earlier religions' beliefs and practices. This new temporal system, based on a lunar calendar and era, was complex and required sophistication and accuracy. From the ninth to the sixteenth centuries, it was the Muslim astronomers of the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires who were responsible for the major advances in mathematics, astronomy and astrology. This fascinating study compares the Islamic concept of time, and its historical and cultural significance, across these three great empires. Each empire, while mindful of earlier models, created a new temporal system, fashioning a new solar calendar and era and a new round of rituals and ceremonies from the cultural resources at hand. This book contributes to our understanding of the Muslim temporal system and our appreciation of the influence of Islamic science on the Western world. https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/time-in-early-modern-islam/41D9C8897C01DA2DC40EDD8E091C0B2D#fndtn-information
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Item type Current location Item location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
General Stacks
Slot 1695 (2 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 529.327 B5T4 (Browse shelf) Available 198624

Table of cantents

1. Safavid, Mughal and Ottoman empires
2. Calendar
3. Ceremony
4. Chronology: era
5. Chronology: millenarian.

The prophet Muhammad and the early Islamic community radically redefined the concept of time that they had inherited from earlier religions' beliefs and practices. This new temporal system, based on a lunar calendar and era, was complex and required sophistication and accuracy. From the ninth to the sixteenth centuries, it was the Muslim astronomers of the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires who were responsible for the major advances in mathematics, astronomy and astrology. This fascinating study compares the Islamic concept of time, and its historical and cultural significance, across these three great empires. Each empire, while mindful of earlier models, created a new temporal system, fashioning a new solar calendar and era and a new round of rituals and ceremonies from the cultural resources at hand. This book contributes to our understanding of the Muslim temporal system and our appreciation of the influence of Islamic science on the Western world.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/time-in-early-modern-islam/41D9C8897C01DA2DC40EDD8E091C0B2D#fndtn-information

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