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Muslim midwives: the craft of birthing in the premodern middle east

By: Giladi, Avner.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi Cambridge university press 2015Description: x, 195 p.ISBN: 9781107646810.Subject(s): Midwifery | Middle East | Islam | Middle Ages | Rites and ceremonies | MidwivesDDC classification: 618.2009394 Summary: This book reconstructs the role of midwives in medieval to early modern Islamic history through a careful reading of a wide range of classical and medieval Arabic sources. The author casts the midwife's social status in premodern Islam as a privileged position from which she could mediate between male authority in patriarchal society and female reproductive power within the family. This study also takes a broader historical view of midwifery in the Middle East by examining the tensions between learned medicine (male) and popular, medico-religious practices (female) from early Islam into the Ottoman period and addressing the confrontation between traditional midwifery and Western obstetrics in the first half of the nineteenth century. https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/muslim-midwives/16EBB34BAD9A7F0D3089B3F0153F8388#fndtn-information
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Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
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Slot 1912 (2 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 618.2009394 G4M9 (Browse shelf) Available 198552

Table of contents
Introduction
1. Islamic views on birth and motherhood
2. Midwifery as a craft
3. The subordinate midwife: male physicians versus female midwives
4. The absent midwife
5. The privileged midwife
6. Ritual, magic, and the midwife's roles in and outside the birthing place
7. From traditional to modern midwifery in the Middle East
Concluding remarks.

This book reconstructs the role of midwives in medieval to early modern Islamic history through a careful reading of a wide range of classical and medieval Arabic sources. The author casts the midwife's social status in premodern Islam as a privileged position from which she could mediate between male authority in patriarchal society and female reproductive power within the family. This study also takes a broader historical view of midwifery in the Middle East by examining the tensions between learned medicine (male) and popular, medico-religious practices (female) from early Islam into the Ottoman period and addressing the confrontation between traditional midwifery and Western obstetrics in the first half of the nineteenth century.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/muslim-midwives/16EBB34BAD9A7F0D3089B3F0153F8388#fndtn-information

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