Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Coalitions of the well being: how electoral rules and ethnic politics shape health policy in developing countries

By: Selway, Joel.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York Cambridge University Press 2015Description: xiii, 292 p. With index.ISBN: 9781107501225.Subject(s): Politics - International relations | Asian studies | Comparative politics | Political parties | Health care | ElectionDDC classification: 362.10425 Summary: Why do some developing countries have more efficient health systems and better health outcomes? Contrary to existing theory that posits the superiority of proportional representation (PR) rules on public-goods provision, this book argues that electoral rules function differently given the underlying ethnic structure. In countries with low ethnic salience, PR has the same positive effect as in past theories. In countries with high ethnic salience, the geographic distribution of ethnic groups further matters: where they are intermixed, PR rules are worse for health outcomes; where they are isolated, neither rule is superior. The theory is supported through a combination of careful analysis of electoral reform in individual country cases with numerous well-designed cross-country comparisons. The case studies include Thailand, Mauritius, Malaysia, Botswana, Burma and Indonesia. The theory has broad implications for electoral rule design and suggests a middle ground in the debate between the Consociational and Centripetal schools of thought. https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/coalitions-of-the-wellbeing/55E204A97E4E9B9843F4E11FAD61E7C1#fndtn-information
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
General Stacks
Slot 1149 (0 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 362.10425 S3C6 (Browse shelf) Available 198501

Why do some developing countries have more efficient health systems and better health outcomes? Contrary to existing theory that posits the superiority of proportional representation (PR) rules on public-goods provision, this book argues that electoral rules function differently given the underlying ethnic structure. In countries with low ethnic salience, PR has the same positive effect as in past theories. In countries with high ethnic salience, the geographic distribution of ethnic groups further matters: where they are intermixed, PR rules are worse for health outcomes; where they are isolated, neither rule is superior. The theory is supported through a combination of careful analysis of electoral reform in individual country cases with numerous well-designed cross-country comparisons. The case studies include Thailand, Mauritius, Malaysia, Botswana, Burma and Indonesia. The theory has broad implications for electoral rule design and suggests a middle ground in the debate between the Consociational and Centripetal schools of thought.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/coalitions-of-the-wellbeing/55E204A97E4E9B9843F4E11FAD61E7C1#fndtn-information

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha