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All the single ladies: unmarried women and the rise of an independent nation

By: Traister, Rebecca.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York Simon & Schuster 2016Description: xii, 339 p.ISBN: 9781476716572.Subject(s): Social science - Women's studies | History - 21st Century - United States | History - Social historyDDC classification: 306.81530973 Summary: A nuanced investigation into the sexual, economic, and emotional lives of women in America, this “singularly triumphant work” (Los Angeles Times) by Rebecca Traister “the most brilliant voice on feminism in the country” (Anne Lamott) is “sure to be vigorously discussed” (Booklist, starred review). In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies—a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism—about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890–1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven.In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies—a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism—about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890–1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven. http://www.simonandschuster.com/books/All-the-Single-Ladies/Rebecca-Traister/9781508215073
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
General Stacks
Non Fiction 306.8153 0973 T7A5 (Browse shelf) Checked out to Priyanka Sharma (RSTC693) 01/05/2017 194252

Table of Contents:


1.Watch out for that Woman: The political and social power of an unmarried nation
2.Single women have often made history: Unmarried in America
3.The sex of the cities: Urban life and female independence
4.Dangerous as Lucifer matches: The friendship of women
5.My solitude, my self: Single women on their own
6.For richer: Work, money and independence
7.For poorer: Single women and sexism, racism and poverty
8.Sex and the single girls: Virginity to promiscuity and beyond
9.Horse and Carriage: Marrying-and not marrying-in the time of singlehood
10.Then come what? and when?: Independence and parenthood



A nuanced investigation into the sexual, economic, and emotional lives of women in America, this “singularly triumphant work” (Los Angeles Times) by Rebecca Traister “the most brilliant voice on feminism in the country” (Anne Lamott) is “sure to be vigorously discussed” (Booklist, starred review).
In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies—a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism—about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890–1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven.In 2009, the award-winning journalist Rebecca Traister started All the Single Ladies—a book she thought would be a work of contemporary journalism—about the twenty-first century phenomenon of the American single woman. It was the year the proportion of American women who were married dropped below fifty percent; and the median age of first marriages, which had remained between twenty and twenty-two years old for nearly a century (1890–1980), had risen dramatically to twenty-seven.


http://www.simonandschuster.com/books/All-the-Single-Ladies/Rebecca-Traister/9781508215073


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