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The new ecology: rethinking a science for the anthropocene

By: Schmitz, Oswald J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Princeton Princeton University Press 2017Description: xiii, 236 p.ISBN: 9780691160566.Subject(s): Ecology | Human ecology | Nature - Effect of human beingsDDC classification: 577 Summary: Our species has transitioned from being one among millions on Earth to the species that is single-handedly transforming the entire planet to suit its own needs. In order to meet the daunting challenges of environmental sustainability in this epoch of human domination—known as the Anthropocene—ecologists have begun to think differently about the interdependencies between humans and the natural world. This concise and accessible book provides the best available introduction to what this new ecology is all about—and why it matters more than ever before. http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10848.html
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Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
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Non-fiction 577 S2N3 (Browse shelf) Available 193806

Table of Contents:

1 The challenge of sustainability
2 Valuing species and ecosystems
3 Biological diversity and ecosystem functions
4 Domesticated nature
5 Socio-ecological systems thinking
6 Hubris to humility
7 Ecologies by humans for humans
8 The ecologist and the new ecology

Our species has transitioned from being one among millions on Earth to the species that is single-handedly transforming the entire planet to suit its own needs. In order to meet the daunting challenges of environmental sustainability in this epoch of human domination—known as the Anthropocene—ecologists have begun to think differently about the interdependencies between humans and the natural world. This concise and accessible book provides the best available introduction to what this new ecology is all about—and why it matters more than ever before.

http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10848.html

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