Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Let's put a smile on that face a study on the embeddedness of humorous advertisements (CD)

By: Khandeparkar, Kapil.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Ahmedabad Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad 2016Description: 167 p.Subject(s): Advertising | Advertising humourDDC classification: TH 2016-07 Summary: Abstract The phenomenon of embeddedness has implications in the field of advertising, as the context in which ads are shown is one of the salient factors influencing their evaluation. The affect transfer hypothesis and 'mood as information' theory suggest that the context is capable of interfering with an individual's ability to invest affective as well as cognitive resources required to process the advertising stimulus. In this study, an integrated framework was tested for studying advertising embeddedness, focusing on three contextual dimensions: (i) type of program (program induced mood: positive vs. negative), (ii) type of commercial break (abrupt vs. smooth), and (iii) the position in a break (pod position: first vs. last). The effectiveness of an ad is also driven by the choice ad content (appeal). In order to test this framework, humour appeal was selected as it has been shown to be the most pervasive appeal among all genres of advertisements. However, past research exploring the impact of humour on advertising effectiveness has shown mixed results. It is postulated that though different types of humorous appeals are used in advertisements, most studies fail to consider their impact individually. This study uses two different types of humorous appeals: incongruity-resolution and arousal-safety. Incongruity-resolution humour involves a high degree of cognitive uncertainty, whereas arousal safety humour is high on affective uncertainty, and it has been shown that the cognitive/affective resources that are required to process these ads successfully are different. Two experiments were designed to test the impact of three contextual dimensions on two types of humorous advertisements. The results indicated that in a context that induced negative mood (vs. positive mood), both ads performed badly, the negative impact was greater on the incongruity resolution ads. Similarly, the negative impact of an abrupt break (vs. smooth break) was greater on incongruity resolution ads as compared to arousal safety ads. In an abrupt break, both the ads performed well at a later pod position as compared to the first pod position. The results are discussed and have implications for researchers as well as practitioners. Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC) Prof. Piyush Kumar Sinha (Chairperson) Prof. Neharika Vohra (Member) Prof. Abhishek (Member)
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1 ........................................................................................................................................................... 4
1.1. INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................................... 4
1.2. MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY .................................................................................................................................. 5
1.3. SCOPE FOR THE STUDY ............................................................................................................................................ 6
CHAPTER 2- ADVERTISEMENTS .............................................................................................................................. 9
2.1. ADVERTISING AND ITS FUNCTIONS .............................................................................................................................. 9
2.2. ADVERTISING EFFECTIVENESS ................................................................................................................................. 10
2.2.1. Recall ....................................................................................................................................................... 11
2.2.2. Attitude ................................................................................................................................................... 13
2.2.3. Ad Cognitions .......................................................................................................................................... 15
2.3. EMBEDDEDNESS OF A STIMULUS ............................................................................................................................... 16
2.3.1. Embeddedness in Advertising ................................................................................................................... 16
CHAPTER 3- ADVERTISING HUMOUR ................................................................................................................... 23
3.1. HUMOUR IN ADVERTISING .................................................................................................................................... 23
3.2 COMMUNICATION GOALS OF HUMOROUS APPEALS ...................................................................................................... 24
3.3 HUMOUR TYPES ................................................................................................................................................... 26
3.2.1. Incongruity-resolution humour ................................................................................................................. 27
3.2.2. Arousal-safety humour............................................................................................................................ 30
3.3. EFFECTIVENESS OF HUMOROUS ADVERTISEMENTS ON ADVERTISING VARIABLES ................................................................ 31
CHAPTER 4 - THE CONTEXTUAL EFFECTS ON EMBEDDED ADVERTISEMENTS ........................................................ 36
4.1. THE AUDIENCE MOOD ......................................................................................................................................... 36
4.1.1. The role of mood in information processing ............................................................................................. 40
4.1.2. The role of mood in affective priming ....................................................................................................... 42
4.1.3. The Decay of Arousal ............................................................................................................................... 45
4.2. THE BREAK TYPE ................................................................................................................................................. 45
4.3. THE POD POSITION .............................................................................................................................................. 46
CHAPTER 5- HYPOTHESES DEVELOPMENT............................................................................................................ 47
5.1. PLACEMENT OF HUMOUROUS ADVERTISEMENTS ......................................................................................................... 47
5.1.1. Placement of Incongruity Resolution Advertisements .............................................................................. 47
5.1.2. Placement of Arousal Safety Advertisements ........................................................................................... 49
5.1.3. Interaction Effect: Mood and Ad Type ...................................................................................................... 51
5.2. IMPACT OF TYPE OF COMMERCIAL BREAK .................................................................................................................. 52
5.3. IMPACT OF MOOD DECAY ..................................................................................................................................... 55
CHAPTER 6- EXPERIMENT 1 ................................................................................................................................ 59
6.1 PARTICIPANTS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN ................................................................................................................. 59
6.2. STIMULI AND PROCEDURE ..................................................................................................................................... 59
6.3. MANIPULATION CHECKS ....................................................................................................................................... 60
6.4. DEPENDENT VARIABLES ........................................................................................................................................ 63
6.5. SAMPLE AND DATA COLLECTION ............................................................................................................................... 64



6.6. RESULTS ............................................................................................................................................................ 65
6.6.1. Pretest Results ......................................................................................................................................... 65
6.6.2. Manipulation Checks ............................................................................................................................... 66
6.6.3. Reliability Analysis ................................................................................................................................... 66
6.6.4. Hypothesis Testing .................................................................................................................................. 66
6.7. DISCUSSION........................................................................................................................................................ 76
CHAPTER 7- EXPERIMENT 2 ................................................................................................................................ 80
7.1 PARTICIPANTS AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN ................................................................................................................. 80
7.2. STIMULI AND PROCEDURE ..................................................................................................................................... 80
7.3. MANIPULATION CHECKS ....................................................................................................................................... 81
7.4. DEPENDENT VARIABLES ........................................................................................................................................ 81
7.5. SAMPLE AND DATA COLLECTION ............................................................................................................................... 82
7.6. RESULTS ............................................................................................................................................................ 82
7.6.1. Pretest Results ......................................................................................................................................... 82
7.6.2. Manipulation Checks ............................................................................................................................... 83
7.6.3. Reliability Analysis ................................................................................................................................... 83
7.6.4. Hypothesis Testing .................................................................................................................................. 83
7.7. DISCUSSION...................................................................................................................................................... 100
CHAPTER 8-IMPLICATIONS AND FUTURE RESEARCH .......................................................................................... 105
8.1. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS .................................................................................................................................... 105
8.2. MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS ................................................................................................................................ 110
8.3. LIMITATIONS..................................................................................................................................................... 113
8.4. FUTURE RESEARCH ............................................................................................................................................ 114
REFERENCES ..................................................................................................................................................... 115
APPENDICES..................................................................................................................................................... 140
APPENDIX 1: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 1 .................................................................................................... 140
APPENDIX 2: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 2 .................................................................................................... 141
APPENDIX 3: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 3 .................................................................................................... 142
APPENDIX 4: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 4 .................................................................................................... 143
APPENDIX 5: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 5 .................................................................................................... 144
APPENDIX 6: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 6 .................................................................................................... 145
APPENDIX 7: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 7 .................................................................................................... 146
APPENDIX 8: DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF HYPOTHESIS 8 .................................................................................................... 147
APPENDIX 9: QUESTIONNAIRE FOR STUDY 1 ................................................................................................................... 148
APPENDIX 10: QUESTIONNAIRE FOR STUDY 2 .................................................................................................................. 156
APPENDIX 11: EXPERIMENTAL STIMULI- ADVERTISEMENTS ................................................................................................ 165
APPENDIX 12: EXPLANATION OF ADS ............................................................................................................................. 167

Abstract
The phenomenon of embeddedness has implications in the field of advertising, as the context in which ads are shown is one of the salient factors influencing their evaluation. The affect transfer hypothesis and 'mood as information' theory suggest that the context is capable of interfering with an individual's ability to invest affective as well as cognitive resources required to process the advertising stimulus. In this study, an integrated framework was tested for studying advertising embeddedness, focusing on three contextual dimensions: (i) type of program (program induced mood: positive vs. negative), (ii) type of commercial break (abrupt vs. smooth), and (iii) the position in a break (pod position: first vs. last).
The effectiveness of an ad is also driven by the choice ad content (appeal). In order to test this framework, humour appeal was selected as it has been shown to be the most pervasive appeal among all genres of advertisements. However, past research exploring the impact of humour on advertising effectiveness has shown mixed results. It is postulated that though different types of humorous appeals are used in advertisements, most studies fail to consider their impact individually. This study uses two different types of humorous appeals: incongruity-resolution and arousal-safety. Incongruity-resolution humour involves a high degree of cognitive uncertainty, whereas arousal safety humour is high on affective uncertainty, and it has been shown that the cognitive/affective resources that are required to process these ads successfully are different.
Two experiments were designed to test the impact of three contextual dimensions on two types of humorous advertisements. The results indicated that in a context that induced negative mood (vs. positive mood), both ads performed badly, the negative impact was greater on the incongruity resolution ads. Similarly, the negative impact of an abrupt break (vs. smooth break) was greater on incongruity resolution ads as compared to arousal safety ads. In an abrupt break, both the ads performed well at a later pod position as compared to the first pod position. The results are discussed and have implications for researchers as well as practitioners.

Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC)

Prof. Piyush Kumar Sinha (Chairperson)
Prof. Neharika Vohra (Member)
Prof. Abhishek (Member)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha