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Theories of the firm

By: Kantarelis, Demetri.
Publisher: London Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. 2014Edition: 4th ed.Description: 379 p.ISBN: 9780907776574.Subject(s): Business enterprises | Business environmentDDC classification: 338.01 Summary: A business firm is a needs-satisfying machine; it is an entity invented and employed by society to better satisfy the society's interests. A society is better off when properly regulated business firms are allowed to carry the bulk of economic activity than when they are not allowed to exist or are severely regulated by the state. And, as history has documented, societies fare better when they are dependent on such business firms than when they are dependent on central planning. (http://www.inderscience.com/browse/book.php?journalID=1023&action=intro)
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Slot 832 (0 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 338.01 K2T4 (Browse shelf) Available 190788
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338.01 K2T4 Theories of the firm 338.020954 I6 India commodity year book 2013: focus on agriculture

CONTENTS

Chapter 1: The business environment in the first quarter of the 21st century
Chapter 2: The firm as a decision-maker
Chapter 3: The neoclassical theory of the firm
Chapter 4: The strategic firm
Chapter 5: The price-discriminating firm and the regulated firm
Chapter 6: The money-managing firm
Chapter 7: The transaction cost theory of the firm
Chapter 8: The principal-agent theory of the firm
Chapter 9: The evolutionary theory of the firm

A business firm is a needs-satisfying machine; it is an entity invented and employed by society to better satisfy the society's interests. A society is better off when properly regulated business firms are allowed to carry the bulk of economic activity than when they are not allowed to exist or are severely regulated by the state. And, as history has documented, societies fare better when they are dependent on such business firms than when they are dependent on central planning.

(http://www.inderscience.com/browse/book.php?journalID=1023&action=intro)

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