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Disquieting gifts: humanitarianism in New Delhi

By: Bornstein, Erica.
Publisher: Cambridge Cambridge University Press India Pvt. Ltd. 2012Description: xiv, 214 p.ISBN: 9789382264637.Subject(s): General | Humanitarianism - India - New Delhi | Philanthropists - India - New Delhi | Hindu giving | CharityDDC classification: 361.7095456 Summary: This book takes a close look at people working on humanitarian projects in New Delhi and addresses several issues – why they engage in philanthropic work, what ‘humanitarianism’ means to them, and the ethical and political tangles they encounter. There are many studies focusing on the outcomes of humanitarian work, but the impulses that inspire people to engage in the first place receive less attention. In this book, the author investigates specific cases of people engaged in humanitarian work to reveal different perceptions of assistance to strangers versus assistance to kin, how the impulse to give to others in distress is tempered by its regulation, suspicions about recipient suitability, and why the figure of the orphan is so valuable in humanitarian discourse. The book would be of interest to students and academics in Sociology, Anthropology, Development Studies and Human Rights.
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361.7095456 B6D4 (Browse shelf) Checked out PM 27/09/2019 179266

This book takes a close look at people working on humanitarian projects in New Delhi and addresses several issues – why they engage in philanthropic work, what ‘humanitarianism’ means to them, and the ethical and political tangles they encounter.

There are many studies focusing on the outcomes of humanitarian work, but the impulses that inspire people to engage in the first place receive less attention. In this book, the author investigates specific cases of people engaged in humanitarian work to reveal different perceptions of assistance to strangers versus assistance to kin, how the impulse to give to others in distress is tempered by its regulation, suspicions about recipient suitability, and why the figure of the orphan is so valuable in humanitarian discourse. The book would be of interest to students and academics in Sociology, Anthropology, Development Studies and Human Rights.

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