Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Understanding Islam

By: Ahmad, Nazir.
Contributor(s): Zakir, Mohammed [Translator].
Publisher: Hyderabad Orient BlackSwan 2012Description: xxvii, 201 p.ISBN: 9788125046691.Subject(s): General | Islam | Islam - CultureDDC classification: 297 Summary: Understanding Islam is a translation of Ijtihad (Striving) written in Urdu by Nazir Ahmad (1836H1912). The original work grew out of a response to the question, Why am I a Muslim?H which had obsessed the author. Marked by clear thinking, a commonsensical approach, erudition and social awareness, Ijtihad was written in a conversational style. Nazir Ahmad also critically examined questions that he felt had perhaps been inadequately understood by his co-religionists, and suggested areas where a change in their outlook might be conducive to the true spirit of Islam. Mohammed Zakirs translation is true to the original, and retains its flavour. This work, a succinct introduction to Islam, will find a place in courses of theology and philosophy, as well as Islamic history. If we agree with Eliot that religion is a cornerstone of culture, this book should also find its way into cultural discourses, especially on Islam and Islamic cultures.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 216 (0 Floor, West Wing) Non-fiction 297 A4U6 (Browse shelf) Available 177228

Includes bibliography

Understanding Islam is a translation of Ijtihad (Striving) written in Urdu by Nazir Ahmad (1836H1912). The original work grew out of a response to the question, Why am I a Muslim?H which had obsessed the author. Marked by clear thinking, a commonsensical approach, erudition and social awareness, Ijtihad was written in a conversational style. Nazir Ahmad also critically examined questions that he felt had perhaps been inadequately understood by his co-religionists, and suggested areas where a change in their outlook might be conducive to the true spirit of Islam. Mohammed Zakirs translation is true to the original, and retains its flavour. This work, a succinct introduction to Islam, will find a place in courses of theology and philosophy, as well as Islamic history. If we agree with Eliot that religion is a cornerstone of culture, this book should also find its way into cultural discourses, especially on Islam and Islamic cultures.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha