Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Polio eradication and its discontents: an historian's journey through an international public health (Un) civil war

By: Muraskin, William.
Series: New perspectives in South Asian history. Publisher: Hydrabad Orient BlackSwan 2012Description: x, 157 p.ISBN: 9788125046561.Subject(s): Tetanus in newborn infants - Prevention | Poliomyelities - PreventionDDC classification: 614.5490954 Summary: There are many infectious diseases which kill millions of children every year the world over, but polio is not one of them. So why did the World Health Assembly in 1988 choose the eradication of polio as a global goal? This is the key question that William Muraskin asks and it inexorably leads to the unravelling of the official heroic story of the fight against polio.The author finds that the public health agenda of every single nation of the world was effectively hijacked by a small group of people working at the global level. They were out to show that eradication was a viable tool in fighting the disease. For this group, the disease of poliomyelitis was not in itself primarily significant but rather it was a disease of opportunity which could be used to prove that disease eradication in general was a viable instrument of public health.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Item location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 1732 (2 Floor, East Wing) Non-fiction 614.5490954 M8P6 (Browse shelf) Available 177204

There are many infectious diseases which kill millions of children every year the world over, but polio is not one of them. So why did the World Health Assembly in 1988 choose the eradication of polio as a global goal? This is the key question that William Muraskin asks and it inexorably leads to the unravelling of the official heroic story of the fight against polio.The author finds that the public health agenda of every single nation of the world was effectively hijacked by a small group of people working at the global level. They were out to show that eradication was a viable tool in fighting the disease. For this group, the disease of poliomyelitis was not in itself primarily significant but rather it was a disease of opportunity which could be used to prove that disease eradication in general was a viable instrument of public health.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha