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Pedagogy for religion: missionary education and the fashioning of Hindus and Muslims in Bengal

By: Sengupta, Parna.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi Orient BlackSwan 2012Description: x, 211 p.ISBN: 9788125045052.Subject(s): Church schools - India - Bengal - History | Education - India - Bengal - History | Hindus - Education - India - Bengal - History | Missions -- Educational work -- India -- Bengal | Muslims - India - Bengal - Education - History | Secularization - India - BengalDDC classification: 371.0712541 Summary: Offering a new approach to the study of religion and empire, this innovative book challenges a widespread myth of modernity that Western rule has had a secularizing effect on the non-West. Sengupta reveals instead the paradox that the pursuit and adaptation of modern vernacular education, mainly imported to the colonies by Protestant missionaries, opened up new ways for Indians to reformulate ideas of community along religious lines. Debates over the mundane aspects of schooling, rather than debates between religious leaders, transformed the everyday definitions of what it meant to be a Christian, Hindu, or Muslim. (http://www.orientblackswan.com/display.asp?categoryID=0&isbn=978-81-250-4505-2)
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Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 1220 (0 Floor, East Wing) 371.07125414 S3P3 (Browse shelf) Available 176454

Offering a new approach to the study of religion and empire, this innovative book challenges a widespread myth of modernity that Western rule has had a secularizing effect on the non-West. Sengupta reveals instead the paradox that the pursuit and adaptation of modern vernacular education, mainly imported to the colonies by Protestant missionaries, opened up new ways for Indians to reformulate ideas of community along religious lines. Debates over the mundane aspects of schooling, rather than debates between religious leaders, transformed the everyday definitions of what it meant to be a Christian, Hindu, or Muslim. (http://www.orientblackswan.com/display.asp?categoryID=0&isbn=978-81-250-4505-2)

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