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The politics of sanitation in India: cities, services and the state

By: Chaplin, Susan E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: South Asia studies / South Asia Institute, New Delhi Branch, Heidelberg University ; no. 42. Publisher: Hyderabad Orient BlackSwan 2011Description: xv, 326 p.ISBN: 9788125042037.Subject(s): Cities and towns - India - Growth | City and town life - India | Urbanization - IndiaDDC classification: 363.720954 Summary: he Politics of Sanitation in India examines how the environmental problems confronting Indian cities have arisen and subsequently forced millions of people to live in illegal settlements that lack adequate sanitation, and other basic urban services. This has occurred because of two factors. The first is the legacy of the colonial city characterised by inequitable access to sanitation services, a failure to manage urban growth and the proliferation of slums, and the inadequate funding of urban governments. The second is the nature of the post-colonial state, which, instead of being an instrument for socio-economic change, has been dominated by coalitions of interests accommodated by the use of public funds to provide private goods. (http://www.orientblackswan.com/display.asp?categoryID=0&isbn=978-81-250-4203-7)
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363.720954 C4P6 (Browse shelf) Available 174540

he Politics of Sanitation in India examines how the environmental problems confronting Indian cities have arisen and subsequently forced millions of people to live in illegal settlements that lack adequate sanitation, and other basic urban services. This has occurred because of two factors. The first is the legacy of the colonial city characterised by inequitable access to sanitation services, a failure to manage urban growth and the proliferation of slums, and the inadequate funding of urban governments. The second is the nature of the post-colonial state, which, instead of being an instrument for socio-economic change, has been dominated by coalitions of interests accommodated by the use of public funds to provide private goods. (http://www.orientblackswan.com/display.asp?categoryID=0&isbn=978-81-250-4203-7)

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