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The business of practicing law: the work lives of solo and small-firm attorneys

By: Seron, Carroll.
Series: Labor and social change. Publisher: Philadelphia Temple University Press 1996Description: xiv, 224 p.ISBN: 9781566394079.Subject(s): Practice of law --United States | Law offices --United States | Lawyers --United StatesDDC classification: 340.068 Summary: This book provides great insight into that continually expanding boundary between professionalism and commercialism. Technology, the expansion of a service-based economy, and the entry of more and more women into the legal profession have had a dramatic effect on the day-to-day business of practicing law. Carroll Seron's discerning examination of the work lives of solo and small-firm attorneys, in contrast to large corporate firms, considers how the small legal entrepreneur must balance professionalism with commerce. The men and women in Seron's book detail a range of creative strategies for getting business, organizing work, and serving clients. What emerges is a multifaceted picture of everything from the day-to-day grind to ways that individuals have expanded or, conversely, scaled down or specialized their practices. Most illuminating is Seron's exploration of the gender differences in practicing law, acquiring business, getting promotions, and balancing personal and professional lives. While a large percentage of married women attorneys are also responsible for the bulk of home and child care, most married men attorneys have a support network at home, which gives them time to generate contacts at social and political functions. (Source: www.alibris.com)
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Item type Current location Item location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Vikram Sarabhai Library
Slot 1065 (0 Floor, East Wing) 340.068 S3B8 (Browse shelf) Available 169318

Includes bibliographical references (p. 201-211) and index

This book provides great insight into that continually expanding boundary between professionalism and commercialism. Technology, the expansion of a service-based economy, and the entry of more and more women into the legal profession have had a dramatic effect on the day-to-day business of practicing law. Carroll Seron's discerning examination of the work lives of solo and small-firm attorneys, in contrast to large corporate firms, considers how the small legal entrepreneur must balance professionalism with commerce. The men and women in Seron's book detail a range of creative strategies for getting business, organizing work, and serving clients. What emerges is a multifaceted picture of everything from the day-to-day grind to ways that individuals have expanded or, conversely, scaled down or specialized their practices. Most illuminating is Seron's exploration of the gender differences in practicing law, acquiring business, getting promotions, and balancing personal and professional lives. While a large percentage of married women attorneys are also responsible for the bulk of home and child care, most married men attorneys have a support network at home, which gives them time to generate contacts at social and political functions. (Source: www.alibris.com)

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